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Daisy

Mixed Breed

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This dog has been viewed 83 times and been given 0 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Mixed Breed

50.0% Australian Shepherd
22.0% Golden Retriever
17.5% Doberman Pinscher
10.5% Boxer
Australian Shepherd Australian Shepherd
Australian Shepherds are an energetic mid-sized breed that make the perfect companion.
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Golden Retriever Golden Retriever
Developed as an ideal hunting retriever, the Golden Retriever's eagerness to please and friendliness has made them an extremely popular family pet.
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Doberman Pinscher Doberman Pinscher
Doberman Pinscher’s are a strong and athletic breed that are built to guard and protect.
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Boxer Boxer
Developed in Germany, the Boxer is a popular family dognull-patient, loyal and smartnull-requiring lots of exercise and proper training.
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 1.1 % MEDIUM Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 41 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 40 human years Learn More

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Daisy’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

Breed Mix Matches

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Australian Shepherd
Golden Retriever
Doberman Pinscher
Boxer

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Family tree

Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 3/2/2018 changed name from "Daisy " to "Daisy"
What’s this?

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Daisy’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Summary

1
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
164
CLEAR
Tap above or scroll down to see more

Clinical traits

These genetic traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal
Known to be highly expressed in liver cells, activity levels of alanine aminotransferase, or ALT, is a common value on most blood chemistry panels and is known to be a se…
Daisy has one copy of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Daisy has thi…

At Risk for 1 genetic condition

Daisy has tested positive for 1 of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.
What does At Risk mean?

Testing positive is predictive of your dog being affected by this condition, but it is not a final diagnosis nor does it predict when symptoms may occur or the severity of a condition in your dog.

Please consult with your veterinarian to determine the best course of action.

Condition List

MDR1 Drug Sensitivity
(MDR1)
Clinical

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with mutatio…

Not A Carrier

Good news! Daisy is not a carrier for any of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Daisy tested clear for 20 genetic conditions that are common in her breed mix.
Condition List

Factor VIII Deficiency, Hemophilia A
(F8 Exon 10, Boxer Variant)
Blood

Coagulopathies represent a broad category of diseases that affect blood clotting, which can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies a…

Seen in Boxers, but not Daisy.

Von Willebrand Disease Type I
(VWF)
Blood

Coagulopathies represent a broad category of diseases that affect blood clotting, which can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies a…

Seen in Doberman Pinschers, but not Daisy.

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia
(TUBB1 Exon 1, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Variant)
Blood

This is a benign disorder of platelet production that leads to abnormally large, sparse platelets. Affected dogs typically do not suffer any ill effects from the size or …

Seen in Boxers, but not Daisy.

Cyclic Neutropenia, Gray Collie Syndrome
(AP3B1 Exon 20)
Blood

This is a disease of neutrophil production where the number of circulating neutrophils drops precipitously, leaving dogs prone to bacterial infections, and then slowly re…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Daisy.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, nonpainful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are th…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, but not Daisy.

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2
(TTC8)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, nonpainful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are th…

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Daisy.

Collie Eye Anomaly, Choroidal Hypoplasia
(NHEJ1)
Eyes

Named for its high prevalence in Collie dogs, Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA) is more correctly termed choroidal hypoplasia and is a developmental disease of the choroid. The ch…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Daisy.

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy
cmr1 (BEST1 Exon 2)
Eyes

This is a nonprogressive retinal disease that, in rare cases, can lead to vision loss. All known mutations lie in the BEST1 gene and are inherited in an autosomal recessi…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Daisy.

Hereditary Cataracts, Early-Onset Cataracts, Juvenile Cataracts
(HSF4 Exon 9 Shepherd Variant)
Eyes

One of the leading causes of blindness in dogs (and humans!), cataracts are a progressive disease of the lens that causes functional blindness, but can be surgically corr…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Daisy.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 6
(CLN6 Exon 7)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Daisy.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis
(CLN8)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Daisy.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis
(CLN5 Exon 4 Variant 2)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Daisy.

Degenerative Myelopathy
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Doberman Pinschers, Boxers, but not Daisy.

Dilated Cardiomyopathy
(PDK4)
Heart

The most common acquired heart disease of dogs, this is a progressive disease of the heart ventricles: early diagnosis and treatment is key. The ventricles are the heavil…

Seen in Doberman Pinschers, but not Daisy.

Muscular Dystrophy
Muscular Dystrophy (DMD Golden Retriever Variant)
Muscular

Characterized by non-painful muscle weakness and wasting, early diagnosis and supportive treatment can slow the pace of this progressive muscle disease. All known mutatio…

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Daisy.

Malignant Hyperthermia
(RYR1)
Metabolic

This condition only manifests if affected dogs are treated with certain inhalant anesthetics, and can cause uncontrollable muscle contractions and a dangerous increase in…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Doberman Pinschers, Boxers, but not Daisy.

Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa
(COL7A1)
Skin & Connective Tissues

This skin disorder gives affected dogs skin that stretches and tears easily; affected dogs must be monitored closely and treated promptly for any injuries. It arises from…

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Daisy.

Ichthyosis
(PNPLA1)
Skin & Connective Tissues

This skin disorder gets its name from the thick, darkly pigmented scales of skin (“ichthys” is Greek for “fish”) that affected dogs display on their noses, paw pads, and …

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Daisy.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Brittle Bone Disease
(COL1A1)
Skeletal

A disease of bone strength and flexibilty, affected dogs often present to the vet for spontaneous bone fractures, tooth fractures and loss, and joint pain; these symptoms…

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Daisy.

Craniomandibular Osteopathy (CMO)
(SLC37A2)
Skeletal

A noncancerous, proliferative bone disease that commonly affects the lower jaw and tympanic bullae, CMO is best known in the West Highland White Terrier, Scottish Terrier…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Daisy.

Other Conditions: Clear of 144

Daisy is clear of 144 other genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

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Family tree

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Coat Color

A number of genes are known to affect coat color in dogs, and they all interact. In some cases, other genetic effects may also influence color and pattern.

Trait
Result
 
E Locus (Mask, Grizzle, Recessive Red)
Eme
K Locus (Dominant Black)
kyky
A Locus (Agouti, Sable)
atat
D Locus (Dilute, Blue, Fawn)
DD
B Locus (Brown, Chocolate, Liver, Red)
BB

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Color genes:

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings, shedding and curls are all genetic! And they all interact, too. In fact, the combination of these genes explains the coat phenotypes of 90% of AKC registered dog breeds.

Trait
Result
 
Furnishings / Improper Coat (RSPO2)
II
Long Haircoat (FGF5)
TT
Shedding (MC5R)
CC
Curly Coat (KRT71)
CC

More information on coat type genetics: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2897713/figure/F3/

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Traits genes:

Other Body Features

Trait
Result
 
Brachycephaly (BMP3)
AC
Natural Bobtail (T)
CC
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
CC
Blue Eye Color
LINKAGE
N/N

Body Size

Body size is a complex trait that is affected by both genetic and environmental variation. Our genetic analysis includes genes that, together, explain over 80% of the variation in dog body size. It does not account for runting or stunting; nor does it account for the interactions between various genes both known and unknown.

Trait
Result
 
Body Size - IGF1
II
Body Size - IGF1R
GG
Body Size - STC2
TT
Body Size - GHR (E195K)
GA
Body Size - GHR (P177L)
CC

Other Embark dogs with these Body Size genes:

Performance

Trait
Result
 
Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
GG

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Family tree

Health

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Through Daisy’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

B1

Haplotype

B1b

Map

B1

Daisy’s Haplogroup

B1 is the second most common maternal lineage in breeds of European or American origin. It is the female line of the majority of Golden Retrievers, Basset Hounds, and Shih Tzus, and about half of Beagles, Pekingese and Toy Poodles. This lineage is also somewhat common among village dogs that carry distinct ancestry from these breeds. We know this is a result of B1 dogs being common amongst the European dogs that their conquering owners brought around the world, because nowhere on earth is it a very common lineage in village dogs. It even enables us to trace the path of (human) colonization: Because most Bichons are B1 and Bichons are popular in Spanish culture, B1 is now fairly common among village dogs in Latin America.

B1b

Daisy’s Haplotype

Part of the large B1 haplogroup, we see this haplotype in village dogs across the world, including those from Central America, the Middle East, South Asia, and the French Polynesian Islands. Among the 31 breed dogs we see it in, we see it in Poodles, Otterhounds, and Labrador Retrievers. It is also our most commonly-sampled Golden Retriever haplotype!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The B1 haplogroup can be found in village dogs like the Peruvian Village Dog, pictured above.

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Family tree

Health

Traits

Paternal Haplotype

This 'Paternal Haplotype' tab is for deep ancestral lineage going back thousands of years.

For recent ancestry—"What breeds did my dog inherit from her mom and dad?"—please refer to the Breed, Family Tree, or Summary tab.

The Paternal Haplotype refers to a dog’s deep ancestral lineage stretching back thousands of years, before there were any distinct breeds of dog. We determine the Paternal Haplotype by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Daisy is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

Explore:

Family tree

Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype