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Cujo

Japanese Chin

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“Cujo loves to be warm with someone. He is very well behaved, and easy to train. He can be a little sassy sometimes when he doesn’t get his way, but he always chooses to be a good boy.”

Place of Birth

Memphis, MO, USA

Current Location

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA

From

Deerfield Beach, Florida, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 21 wags

Registration

American Kennel Club (AKC):

Genetic Breed Result

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Japanese Chin

The Japanese Chin is a little breed that was born to rule the roost. Though Chinese in origin, these dogs were brought to Japan to serve as the companions of Japanese dignitaries. This is a loving dog that knows it is the real deal.

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Breed Reveal Video

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Cujo’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Cujo has one variant that you should let your vet know about.

ALT Activity

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Cujo inherited both copies of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Cujo has two copies of a variant in the GPT gene and is likely to have a lower than average baseline ALT activity. ALT is a commonly used measure of liver health on routine veterinary blood chemistry panels. As such, your veterinarian may want to watch for changes in Cujo's ALT activity above their current, healthy, ALT activity. As an increase above Cujo’s baseline ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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GM2 Gangliosidosis

Identified in Japanese Chins

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Cujo’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

B1

Haplotype

B81

Map

B1

Cujo’s Haplogroup

B1 is the second most common maternal lineage in breeds of European or American origin. It is the female line of the majority of Golden Retrievers, Basset Hounds, and Shih Tzus, and about half of Beagles, Pekingese and Toy Poodles. This lineage is also somewhat common among village dogs that carry distinct ancestry from these breeds. We know this is a result of B1 dogs being common amongst the European dogs that their conquering owners brought around the world, because nowhere on earth is it a very common lineage in village dogs. It even enables us to trace the path of (human) colonization: Because most Bichons are B1 and Bichons are popular in Spanish culture, B1 is now fairly common among village dogs in Latin America.

B81

Cujo’s Haplotype

Part of the large B1 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in Shih Tzus, Chihuahuas, and Poodles.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The B1 haplogroup can be found in village dogs like the Peruvian Village Dog, pictured above.

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Through Cujo’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

D

Haplotype

H7.1/6/7

Map

D

Cujo’s Haplogroup

The D paternal lineage is very common in well-known populations of dogs. Breeds belonging to the D lineage likely have direct male ancestors that can be traced all the way back to the origin of domestic dogs themselves! One popular breed that commonly sports a D lineage is the Boxer. Boxers were developed in the late 19th century from Mastiff dogs, so it is no surprise that D is well represented among Mastiffs, Bulldogs, as well as Terriers. Intriguingly, D is also found among Lhasa Apsos, an ancient Tibetan breed, and Afghan Hounds. While the presence of this lineage in Polynesia or the New World can be chalked up to interbreeding with European dogs brought during voyages of discovery or later settlement, D is also well represented among village dog populations in the Middle East and Africa. If the fact that we find dogs bearing a D lineage in the Middle East (not to mention the large amount of diversity among Middle Eastern D lineage males) is any indication of ancient residence in that region, then the presence among Oceanian village dogs is peculiar. Rather, it may be that D is part of a broader Eurasian group of ancient paternal lineages which disappeared from the eastern portion of its original range, persisting in the island of New Guinea as well as West Asia and Africa. With the rise of Mastiff breeds, the D lineage received a new life as it became common among many types of working dogs.

H7.1/6/7

Cujo’s Haplotype

Part of the D haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in mixed breed dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The D paternal lineage is common in Boxers.

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