Venn diagram

Compare your dogs to Kimchi Select one to begin:

“Kimchi”
CSB Agent Felix Leiter FCh

Silken Windhound

“The happiest boy who loves chasing his bunny as much as he loves being the center of attention. Never known a stranger and is the most docile boy to exist! Low arousal, high drive, and the perfect combination for a versatile sport dog! He is showing a lot of promise in many venues already!”

Current Location

Longmont, Colorado, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 0 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Loading...

Silken Windhound

These gentle dogs are descended from the larger Borzoi, the shorter-coated Whippet, and a bit of Sheltie, but are today very much a breed all their own.

Learn More

Loading...

Start a conversation! Message this dog’s owner.

Loading...

Explore

Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 3/29/2023 changed name from "CSB Agent Felix Leiter" to "CSB Agent Felix Leiter FCh"
  • On 3/29/2023 changed name from "CSB Agent Felix Leiter FCh" to "CSB Agent Felix Leiter"
  • On 3/29/2023 changed name from "CSB Agent Felix Leiter" to "CSB Agent Felix Leiter FCh"

Health Summary

danger icon

Kimchi is at increased risk for one genetic health condition.

And inherited two variants that you should learn more about.

Multiple Drug Sensitivity

danger icon

Kimchi inherited one copy of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Kimchi has one copy of a variant at the ABCB1 gene and is at risk for displaying adverse drug reactions. While he may not be as severely affected as a dog with two copies of the ABCB1 drug sensitivity allele, normal dosages of drugs could still have potentially severe effects on Kimchi. Please inform your veterinarian that Kimchi carries this variant; it is essential that they know this information before prescribing drugs.

What is Multiple Drug Sensitivity?

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with a mutation in the ABCB1 gene.

Bald Thigh Syndrome

warn icon

Kimchi inherited both copies of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

We do not know whether this increases the risk that Kimchi will develop Bald Thigh Syndrome.

Scientific Basis

Research studies for this variant have been based on dogs of other breeds. Not enough dogs with Kimchi's breed have been studied to know whether or not this variant will increase Kimchi's risk of developing this disease.

Impact on Breeding

Research into the clinical impact of this variant is ongoing. We recommend tracking this genetic result and incidence of Bald Thigh Syndrome in your breeding program and related dogs.

What is Bald Thigh Syndrome?

A cosmetic condition common to sighthounds characterized by hair loss on the thighs. It is caused by a structural abnormality of the hair follicle.

ALT Activity

warn icon

Kimchi inherited one copy of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Kimchi has one copy of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Kimchi has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Kimchi is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Kimchi’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

good icon

Collie Eye Anomaly (NHEJ1)

Identified in Silken Windhounds

Additional Genetic Conditions

good icon

Explore

Traits

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

Loading...

Explore

Through Kimchi’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A424

Map

A1d

CSB Agent Felix Leiter FCh’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A424

CSB Agent Felix Leiter FCh’s Haplotype

Part of the A1d haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in American Pit Bull Terriers, Barbets, and Staffordshire Terriers.

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

Loading...

Explore

Through Kimchi’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.60

Map

A1a

CSB Agent Felix Leiter FCh’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.60

CSB Agent Felix Leiter FCh’s Haplotype

Part of the A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in mixed-breed dogs.

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.

Loading...

Explore