Crystal

Mixed Breed

“We rescued Crystal when she was 5 years old. She had 4 homes before us and I really don't know why. She was such a loving, sweet dog. She loved car rides, walks, exploring, chasing the hoover, food and of course her favourite thing to do was sleep with her teddies. She would always welcome you with a teddy when we got home. Unfortunately Crystal suddenly became ill one night and I had to put her to sleep. RIP Crystal.”

Current Location
Peterborough, England, United Kingdom

This dog has been viewed 34 times and been given 27 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Mixed Breed

38.2% Russell-type Terrier
15.1% Yorkshire Terrier
14.7% Border Terrier
14.1% English Springer Spaniel
11.8% Welsh Terrier
6.1% English Cocker Spaniel (Working Type)
Russell-type Terrier Russell-type Terrier
These small, energetic terriers, developed in 19th century England for hunting small game, are now some of the best agility dogs around.
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Yorkshire Terrier Yorkshire Terrier
Petite but proud, the Yorkshire terrier is a popular toy breed with a silky, low-shedding coat.
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Border Terrier Border Terrier
The Border Terrier is a feisty terrier breed that was originally bred for assisting with foxhunts by flushing foxes out of their hiding places. Today, they’re primarily companions with a lot of personality. Though they come in a small package, Border Terriers have the drive and energy to dig, hunt, and play.
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English Springer Spaniel English Springer Spaniel
English Springer Spaniels are an energetic and loyal companion dog, bred for hunting but also popular among families.
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Welsh Terrier Welsh Terrier
Welsh Terriers have a contagious zest for life, always enjoying themselves. Bred to hunt independently, with all the self-determination and intelligence that entails, the happy and lively Welshie rarely gets tired and wants to spend every day having fun, fun, fun. Their joy, attitude, and brains all add up to one wonderful package: a true Terrier.
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English Cocker Spaniel (Working Type) English Cocker Spaniel (Working Type)
English Cockers are a medium-size dog with long ears and a happy disposition. The name Cocker comes from their use to hunt woodcock in England, although English Cockers have been used to hunt many other types of birds as well. They make great companion dogs for people who can give them the exercise they need. A field-bred cocker spaniel is first and foremost an upland flushing dog, bred for skills like hup, retrieve to hand, quarter, follow hand signals, and steady.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.3 % LOW Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
79 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Crystal’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Russell-type Terrier
Yorkshire Terrier
Border Terrier
English Springer Spaniel
Welsh Terrier
English Cocker Spaniel (Working Type)

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Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Russell-type Terrier mix Yorkshire Terrier / Border Terrier mix English Springer Spaniel / English Cocker Spaniel (Working Type) mix Russell-type Terrier Russell-type Terrier / Welsh Terrier mix Yorkshire Terrier Border Terrier English Springer Spaniel English Cocker Spaniel (Working Type) mix Russell-type Terrier Russell-type Terrier Russell-type Terrier Welsh Terrier

Breed Reveal Video

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Crystal’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown fur coat
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have large white areas in coat
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Harlequin
No impact on coat pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely long coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Smaller
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Crystal’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A435

Map

A1e

Crystal’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A435

Crystal’s Haplotype

Part of the A1e haplogroup, the A435 haplotype occurs most commonly in Russell-type Terriers. It's a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Crystal inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Crystal is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.