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Cosmo

Mixed Breed

“He's a great dog!”

Place of Birth
California, USA
Current Location
Milwaukie, Oregon, USA
From
Oregon Humane Society, Northeast Columbia Boulevard, Portland, OR, USA

This dog has been viewed 699 times and been given 1 wag

Genetic Breed Result

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Mixed Breed

47.0% Great Pyrenees
23.0% Border Collie
22.0% Labrador Retriever
8.0% Australian Shepherd
Great Pyrenees Great Pyrenees
The Great Pyrenees is an exceptionally loving dog whose primary function is to protect sheep, goats, livestock, people, children, grass, flowers, the moon, lawn furniture, and any real or imaginary predators that may intrude on your personal space. They have a strong build and an amazing thick white coat that exudes elegance and majesty. They make a great family dog because of their intelligence and steady temperament.
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Border Collie Border Collie
Border Collies are highly energetic and work oriented herding dogs, whose stamina is matched by their intelligence and alertness. If you want the smartest dog out there, then you have come to the right place!
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Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever
The Labrador Retriever was bred for hunting and excelled in retrieving game after it was shot down. Known for its gentle disposition and loyalty, the Labrador Retriever has become a favorite of families and breeders alike.
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Australian Shepherd Australian Shepherd
Australian Shepherds are an energetic mid-sized breed that make the perfect companion.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

1.4 % MEDIUM Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
29 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Cosmo’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Great Pyrenees
Border Collie
Labrador Retriever
Australian Shepherd
Changes to this dog’s profile
Learn More
  • On 12/7/2018 changed name from "Cosmo " to "Cosmo"

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Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.
 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Great Pyrenees mix Labrador Retriever mix Border Collie / Australian Shepherd mix Great Pyrenees Great Pyrenees mix Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever mix Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix Great Pyrenees Great Pyrenees Great Pyrenees Great Pyrenees mix

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Cosmo’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Summary

0
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
167
CLEAR
Tap above or scroll down to see more

Clinical Traits

These clinical traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Normal
Cosmo has two normal alleles at ALT.

Genetic Health Conditions

A genetic health condition indicates a genetic mutation that increases the risk that an animal develops a specific disease.

Not At Risk

Good news! Cosmo did not test positive for any of the genetic conditions that Embark screens for.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Cosmo’s diagnosis and treatment if he gets sick in the future.

Not A Carrier

Good news! Cosmo is not a carrier for any of the genetic conditions that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Cosmo tested clear for 30 genetic conditions that are common in his breed mix.
Condition List

MDR1 Drug Sensitivity
(MDR1)
Clinical

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with mutatio…

Seen in Border Collies, Australian Shepherds, but not Cosmo.

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia
(TUBB1 Exon 1, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Variant)
Blood

This is a benign disorder of platelet production that leads to abnormally large, sparse platelets. Affected dogs typically do not suffer any ill effects from the size or …

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Canine Elliptocytosis
(SPTB Exon 30)
Blood

A benign disease that affects red blood cell shape, elliptocytosis rarely causes symptoms. Upon examination of a blood smear, however, affected dogs have elongated, oval …

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia Type I
(ITGA2B Exon 13)
Blood

A disease of defective platelet aggregation, this causes affected dogs to bleed excessively in response to mild tissue trauma. Platelets are the first responders to tissu…

Seen in Great Pyreneess, but not Cosmo.

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency
(PKLR Exon 7 Labrador Variant)
Blood

This is a disease of red blood cells characterized by low energy level, jaundiced skin, and pale and cool extremities. Dogs affected with PKD have red blood cells that ha…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome
(VPS13B)
Blood

Dogs with TNS are prone to recurrent bacterial infections that must be recognized and treated early. Neutrophils, a type of white blood cells, are generated in the bone m…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Cosmo.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, Australian Shepherds, but not Cosmo.

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2, GR-PRA2
(TTC8)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1
(RPGRIP1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Collie Eye Anomaly, Choroidal Hypoplasia, CEA
(NHEJ1)
Eyes

Named for its high prevalence in Collie dogs, Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA) is more correctly termed choroidal hypoplasia and is a developmental disease of the choroid. The ch…

Seen in Border Collies, Australian Shepherds, but not Cosmo.

Achromatopsia
(CNGA3 Exon 7 Labrador Retriever Variant)
Eyes

This is a progressive, nonpainful disorder of the retina that affects color vision and light perception. Cone cells not only register color, they allow the dog to adjust …

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy
cmr1 (BEST1 Exon 2)
Eyes

This is a non-progressive retinal disease that, in rare cases, can lead to vision loss. CMR is typically only identified when a vet examines the eye which, in dogs with C…

Seen in Great Pyreneess, Australian Shepherds, but not Cosmo.

Hereditary Cataracts, Early-Onset Cataracts, Juvenile Cataracts
(HSF4 Exon 9 Shepherd Variant)
Eyes

One of the leading causes of blindness in dogs (and humans!), cataracts are a progressive disease of the lens that causes functional blindness, but can be surgically corr…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Cosmo.

Macular Corneal Dystrophy, MCD
(CHST6)
Eyes

A disease of middle-aged dogs, MCD was first characterized in the Labrador Retriever. Affected dogs begin to show clouding of the eyes and visual impairment due to abnorm…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Hyperuricosuria and Hyperuricemia or Urolithiasis, HUU
(SLC2A9)
Kidney and Bladder

This condition causes kidney and bladder stones composed of urate; if caught early, it is responsive to dietary management. Uric acid is an intermediate of purine metabol…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Cosmo.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 1
(CLN5 Border Collie Variant)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Cosmo.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 6, NCL 6
(CLN6 Exon 7)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Cosmo.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis
(CLN8 Australian Shepherd Variant)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Cosmo.

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Cosmo.

Narcolepsy
(HCRTR2 Intron 6)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A neurologic condition characterized by daytime sleepiness and fragmented sleep cycles, affected dogs also exhibit episodes of cataplexy, a sudden complete loss of muscle…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Centronuclear Myopathy
(PTPLA)
Muscular

This muscle disorder is characterized by exercise intolerance, weight loss, and muscle wasting. While abnormal tendon reflexes can be observed as early as 1 month, the sy…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Exercise-Induced Collapse
(DNM1)
Muscular

First characterized in field-trial lines of Labrador Retriever dogs, this muscle disorder can cause episodes of muscle weakness and sometimes collapse; after recovering, …

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Myotonia Congenita
(CLCN1 Exon 23)
Muscular

This condition is characterized by prolonged muscle contraction and stiffness that usually resolves with normal exercise, though physical therapy can be beneficial. The g…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Cosmo.

Myotubular Myopathy 1, X-linked Myotubular Myopathy, XL-MTM
(MTM1, Labrador Variant)
Muscular

This is a degenerative muscle disease first characterized in the Labrador Retriever. Affected dogs present as puppies with failure to thrive and weakness; this rapidly pr…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Imerslund-Grasbeck Syndrome, Selective Cobalamin Malabsorption
(CUBN Exon 53)
Gastrointestinal

This is a treatable gastrointestinal disease where dogs cannot absorb cobalamin, often causing them to be runty with poor energy levels. Cobalamin is required for synthes…

Seen in Border Collies, but not Cosmo.

Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome
(COLQ)
Neuromuscular

This is a non-progressive disease characterized by episodes of exercise intolerance and weakness; some forms have been shown to respond to medical treatment. Though it ha…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Hereditary Nasal Parakeratosis
(SUV39H2)
Skin & Connective Tissues

This condition causes the skin of the nose to be overly thick and shingle-like, which can be uncomfortable for your dog. HNPK isn't usually as upsetting to the dog as it …

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Oculoskeletal Dysplasia 1, Dwarfism-Retinal Dysplasia, OSD1
(COL9A3, Labrador Retriever)
Skeletal

A developmental disease described in the Labrador Retriever and the Samoyed, affected dogs can show signs very early in life and can include dramatic short-limbed dwarfis…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Skeletal Dysplasia 2, SD2
(COL11A2)
Skeletal

A disease of skeletal development, this causes dogs to have abnormally short legs but similar body lengths compared to unaffected dogs, and can be observed by the time do…

Seen in Labrador Retrievers, but not Cosmo.

Craniomandibular Osteopathy, CMO
(SLC37A2)
Skeletal

A noncancerous, proliferative bone disease that commonly affects the lower jaw and tympanic bullae, CMO is best known in the West Highland White Terrier, Scottish Terrier…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Cosmo.

Other Conditions:
Clear of 137

Cosmo is clear of 137 other genetic conditions that Embark tests for.
Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
No Call
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown fur coat
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Likely to have hind dew claws
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Smaller
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance

Through Cosmo’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A25

Map

A1e

Cosmo’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A25

Cosmo’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, we have detected this haplotype in village dogs in Mexico. We also see it in Irish Wolfhounds, Great Pyrenees, Brittanys, and Labrador Retrievers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

Through Cosmo’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.20

Map

A1a

Cosmo’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.20

Cosmo’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs in village dogs throughout the world (outside of Asia). It is quite common in breed dogs, occurring frequently in Golden Retrievers, Irish Wolfhounds, Scottish Terriers, Border Collies, and Mastiffs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.