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Cooper

Mixed Breed

“We ( Kathy and Pete) adopted Cooper on Nov 8 2018 , from a foster family, and AWA Voorhees NJ. He came from a South Carolina shelter. His birthdate is approx Aug 1 2018. He is an energetic and a cuddle bug too! He loves to play and enjoys running with us on bike rides!”

Instagram tag
@Cooper__Dawg

Place of Birth
South Carolina, USA
Current Location
Mt Laurel, New Jersey, USA
From
Voorhees Township, NJ, USA

This dog has been viewed 2324 times and been given 5 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

38.2% Siberian Husky
19.7% American Staffordshire Terrier
12.1% Boxer
11.8% Alaskan Malamute
10.6% Chow Chow
7.6% Perro de Presa Canario
Siberian Husky Siberian Husky
Bred initially in Northern Siberia, the Siberian Husky is a medium-sized working dog who is quick and light on their feet. Their moderately compact and well furred body, erect ears and brush tail suggest their Northern heritage. Huskies are very active and energetic and are known for being long distance sled dogs.
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American Staffordshire Terrier American Staffordshire Terrier
American Staffordshire Terriers are powerful but playful dogs that are both loyal and affectionate with their owners.
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Boxer Boxer
Developed in Germany, the Boxer is a popular family dog-patient, loyal and smart-requiring lots of exercise and proper training.
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Alaskan Malamute Alaskan Malamute
The Alaskan Malamute is a large, fluffy spitz breed recognized as being one of the most ancient breeds of dogs. The forebears to the modern Malamute crossed the Bering Strait with their owners over 4,000 years ago. Their size, thick coat, and work drive make them ideal dogs for pulling sleds, but they also make amicable companions.
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Chow Chow Chow Chow
This distinctive-looking dog breed has a proud, independent spirit that some describe as catlike. Often aloof and suspicious of strangers, the Chow Chow may not be a cuddle buddy, but for the right person, they are a fiercely loyal companion.
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Perro de Presa Canario Perro de Presa Canario
This large, protective Molosser-type breed is often referred to as a Presa Canario or simply "Presa". These dogs were originally bred to work livestock, and now are often used as guard dogs. They're loyal and docile to their family members and often alert or suspicious with strangers.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

1.8 % HIGH Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
25 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Cooper’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Siberian Husky
American Staffordshire Terrier
Boxer
Alaskan Malamute
Chow Chow
Perro de Presa Canario

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Siberian Husky mix Mixed Siberian Husky Siberian Husky / Alaskan Malamute mix American Staffordshire Terrier / Perro de Presa Canario mix Boxer / Chow Chow mix Siberian Husky Siberian Husky Siberian Husky Alaskan Malamute American Staffordshire Terrier Perro de Presa Canario mix Boxer Chow Chow

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Cooper’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Cooper inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

And one variant that you should tell your vet about.

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Cooper inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Degenerative Myelopathy, DM?

The dog equivalent of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, DM is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord. Because the nerves that control the hind limbs are the first to degenerate, the most common clinical signs are back muscle wasting and gait abnormalities.


ALT Activity

Cooper inherited one copy of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Cooper has one copy of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Cooper has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Cooper is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Cooper’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Factor VII Deficiency

Identified in Alaskan Malamutes

Hemophilia A

Identified in Boxers

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia

Identified in Boxers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in American Staffordshire Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd2

Identified in American Staffordshire Terriers

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy

Identified in Perro de Presa Canarios

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in American Staffordshire Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in American Staffordshire Terriers

GM1 Gangliosidosis

Identified in Siberian Huskies

Polyneuropathy, NDRG1 Malamute Variant

Identified in Alaskan Malamutes

Additional Genetic Conditions

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Fawn Sable coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Likely to have blue eyes or partial blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Larger
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Cooper’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

B1

Haplotype

B28

Map

B1

Cooper’s Haplogroup

B1 is the second most common maternal lineage in breeds of European or American origin. It is the female line of the majority of Golden Retrievers, Basset Hounds, and Shih Tzus, and about half of Beagles, Pekingese and Toy Poodles. This lineage is also somewhat common among village dogs that carry distinct ancestry from these breeds. We know this is a result of B1 dogs being common amongst the European dogs that their conquering owners brought around the world, because nowhere on earth is it a very common lineage in village dogs. It even enables us to trace the path of (human) colonization: Because most Bichons are B1 and Bichons are popular in Spanish culture, B1 is now fairly common among village dogs in Latin America.

B28

Cooper’s Haplotype

Part of the large B1 haplogroup, we have spotted this haplotype frequently in Cocker Spaniels, Pomeranians, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, and village dogs in Liberia and Namibia.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The B1 haplogroup can be found in village dogs like the Peruvian Village Dog, pictured above.

Through Cooper’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

Ha.4/11

Map

A1b

Cooper’s Haplogroup

For most of dog history, this haplogroup was probably quite rare. However, a couple hundred years ago it seems to have found its way into a prized male guard dog in Europe who had many offspring, including the ancestors of many European guard breeds such as Doberman Pinchers, St. Bernards, and Great Danes. Despite being rare, many of the most imposing dogs on Earth have it; strangely, so do many Pomeranians! Perhaps this explains why some Poms are so tough, acting like they're ten times their actual size! This lineage is most commonly found in working dogs, in particular guard dogs. With origins in Europe, it spread widely across other regions as Europeans took their dogs across the world.

Ha.4/11

Cooper’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in mixed breed dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Great Danes and Pomeranians have this in common!