What is Embark?

Cooper

Mixed Breed

“Lays with his back legs frogged and front legs crossed.”

This dog has been viewed 471 times and been given 0 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

30.8% German Shepherd Dog
34.4% Australian Shepherd
16.3% Australian Cattle Dog
9.0% Golden Retriever
4.1% Collie
5.4% Alaskan Malamute
German Shepherd Dog German Shepherd Dog
German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence.
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Australian Shepherd Australian Shepherd
Australian Shepherds are an energetic mid-sized breed that make the perfect companion.
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Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
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Golden Retriever Golden Retriever
Developed as an ideal hunting retriever, the Golden Retriever's eagerness to please and friendliness has made them an extremely popular family pet.
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Collie Collie
Collies are attractive herding dogs, boasting a beautiful coat while being highly intelligent. They also make for extremely loyal and sweet family pets.
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Alaskan Malamute Alaskan Malamute
The Alaskan Malamute features a powerful, sturdy body built for stamina and strength. It reigns as one of the oldest dog breeds whose original looks have not been significantly altered. This intelligent canine needs a job and consistent leadership to avoid becoming bored or challenging to handle.
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 0.6 % LOW Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 53 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 55 human years Learn More

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Cooper’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
German Shepherd Dog
Australian Shepherd
Australian Cattle Dog
Golden Retriever
Collie
Alaskan Malamute

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Family tree

Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Mixed German Shepherd Dog / Australian Shepherd mix Australian Cattle Dog / Collie mix German Shepherd Dog / Australian Shepherd mix Australian Cattle Dog / Golden Retriever mix German Shepherd Dog Australian Shepherd Australian Cattle Dog mix Collie mix German Shepherd Dog Australian Shepherd Australian Cattle Dog mix Golden Retriever mix
Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Cooper’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Summary

1
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
156
CLEAR
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Clinical traits

These genetic traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal
Known to be highly expressed in liver cells, activity levels of alanine aminotransferase, or ALT, is a common value on most blood chemistry panels and is known to be a se…
Cooper has two copies of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity. Please inform your veterinarian that Cooper has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indica…

At Risk for 1 genetic condition

Cooper has tested positive for 1 of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.
What does At Risk mean?

Testing positive is predictive of your dog being affected by this condition, but it is not a final diagnosis nor does it predict when symptoms may occur or the severity of a condition in your dog.

Please consult with your veterinarian to determine the best course of action.

Condition List

Dilated Cardiomyopathy
(PDK4)
Heart

The most common acquired heart disease of dogs, this is a progressive disease of the heart ventricles: early diagnosis and treatment is key. The ventricles are the heavil…

Not A Carrier

Good news! Cooper is not a carrier for any of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Cooper tested clear for 28 genetic conditions that are common in his breed mix.
Condition List

MDR1 Drug Sensitivity
(MDR1)
Clinical

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with mutatio…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, Australian Shepherds, Collies, but not Cooper.

Factor VII Deficiency
(F7 Exon 5)
Blood

Coagulopathies represent a broad category of diseases that affect blood clotting, which can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies a…

Seen in Alaskan Malamutes, but not Cooper.

Factor VIII Deficiency, Hemophilia A
(F8 Exon 11, Shepherd Variant 1)
Blood

Coagulopathies represent a broad category of diseases that affect blood clotting, which can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies a…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Cooper.

Factor VIII Deficiency, Hemophilia A
(F8 Exon 1, Shepherd Variant 2)
Blood

Coagulopathies represent a broad category of diseases that affect blood clotting, which can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies a…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Cooper.

Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type III (LAD3)
(FERMT3)
Blood

A rare disorder of white blood cells, this causes increased susceptibility to infections and bleeding tendencies. Affected dogs present with a history of persistent skin …

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Cooper.

Cyclic Neutropenia, Gray Collie Syndrome
(AP3B1 Exon 20)
Blood

This is a disease of neutrophil production where the number of circulating neutrophils drops precipitously, leaving dogs prone to bacterial infections, and then slowly re…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, Collies, but not Cooper.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, nonpainful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are th…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, Australian Cattle Dogs, Golden Retrievers, but not Cooper.

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2
(TTC8)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, nonpainful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are th…

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Cooper.

Collie Eye Anomaly, Choroidal Hypoplasia
(NHEJ1)
Eyes

Named for its high prevalence in Collie dogs, Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA) is more correctly termed choroidal hypoplasia and is a developmental disease of the choroid. The ch…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, Collies, but not Cooper.

Achromatopsia
(CNGA3 Exon 7 German Shepherd Variant)
Eyes

This is a progressive, nonpainful disorder of the retina that affects color vision and light perception. Cone cells not only register color, they allow the dog to adjust …

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Cooper.

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy
cmr1 (BEST1 Exon 2)
Eyes

This is a nonprogressive retinal disease that, in rare cases, can lead to vision loss. All known mutations lie in the BEST1 gene and are inherited in an autosomal recessi…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Cooper.

Primary Lens Luxation
(ADAMTS17)
Eyes

This surgically correctable condition causes the lens to spontaneously detach from its normal residence within the pupil, leading to reduced visual acuity and irritation …

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Cooper.

Cystinuria Type II-A
(SLC3A1)
Kidney and Bladder

A disease of cystine accumulation, affected dogs are prone to developing cystine kidney and bladder stones, which if caught early can be managed with dietary changes, inc…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Cooper.

X-linked Ectodermal Dysplasia, Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia
(EDA Intron 8)
Multisystem

This developmental condition can cause a scanty haircoat, malformed teeth, and few or absent sweat glands. Because dogs only have sweat glands on their paw pads, they are…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Cooper.

Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis (RCND)
(FLCN Exon 7)
Multisystem

A multiorgan syndrome best described in the German Shepherd Dog, affected dogs display thick skin nodules and signs of kidney disease, and should be evaluated by a veteri…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Cooper.

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome
(GUSB Exon 3)
Multisystem

A type of lysosomal storage disease, this can cause skeletal abnormalities, growth retardation, and gait abnormalities, and can require close monitoring and special measu…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, but not Cooper.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1
(CLN5 Exon 4 Variant 1)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Cooper.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 6
(CLN6 Exon 7)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, but not Cooper.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis
(CLN8)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Australian Shepherds, Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Cooper.

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis
(CLN5 Exon 4 Variant 2)
Multisystem

This form of lysosomal storage disease can cause juvenile to adult-onset neurologic signs, depending on the affected gene. While lipofuscin is commonly observed in the ti…

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Cooper.

Degenerative Myelopathy
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, Australian Shepherds, Australian Cattle Dogs, Golden Retrievers, Collies, Alaskan Malamutes, but not Cooper.

Polyneuropathy, NDRG1 Malamute Variant
(NDRG1 Exon 4)
Brain and Spinal Cord

Polyneuropathy is a progressive neurologic disease that causes peripheral nerve dysfution. Peripheral nerves relay messages between the brain and spinal cord to the rest …

Seen in Alaskan Malamutes, but not Cooper.

Muscular Dystrophy
Muscular Dystrophy (DMD Golden Retriever Variant)
Muscular

Characterized by non-painful muscle weakness and wasting, early diagnosis and supportive treatment can slow the pace of this progressive muscle disease. All known mutatio…

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Cooper.

Myotonia Congenita
(CLCN1 Exon 23)
Muscular

This condition is characterized by prolonged muscle contraction and stiffness that usually resolves with normal exercise, though physical therapy can be beneficial. The g…

Seen in Australian Cattle Dogs, but not Cooper.

Malignant Hyperthermia
(RYR1)
Metabolic

This condition only manifests if affected dogs are treated with certain inhalant anesthetics, and can cause uncontrollable muscle contractions and a dangerous increase in…

Seen in German Shepherd Dogs, Australian Shepherds, Australian Cattle Dogs, Golden Retrievers, Collies, Alaskan Malamutes, but not Cooper.

Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa
(COL7A1)
Skin & Connective Tissues

This skin disorder gives affected dogs skin that stretches and tears easily; affected dogs must be monitored closely and treated promptly for any injuries. It arises from…

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Cooper.

Ichthyosis
(PNPLA1)
Skin & Connective Tissues

This skin disorder gets its name from the thick, darkly pigmented scales of skin (“ichthys” is Greek for “fish”) that affected dogs display on their noses, paw pads, and …

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Cooper.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Brittle Bone Disease
(COL1A1)
Skeletal

A disease of bone strength and flexibilty, affected dogs often present to the vet for spontaneous bone fractures, tooth fractures and loss, and joint pain; these symptoms…

Seen in Golden Retrievers, but not Cooper.

Other Conditions: Clear of 128

Cooper is clear of 128 other genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

Explore:

Family tree

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Coat Color

A number of genes are known to affect coat color in dogs, and they all interact. In some cases, other genetic effects may also influence color and pattern.

Trait
Result
 
E Locus (Mask, Grizzle, Recessive Red)
EE or Ee or ee
K Locus (Dominant Black)
kyky
A Locus (Agouti, Sable)
aa or ata or atat
D Locus (Dilute, Blue, Fawn)
DD
B Locus (Brown, Chocolate, Liver, Red)
bb

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Color genes:

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings, shedding and curls are all genetic! And they all interact, too. In fact, the combination of these genes explains the coat phenotypes of 90% of AKC registered dog breeds.

Trait
Result
 
Long Haircoat (FGF5)
TT
Shedding (MC5R)
CC
Curly Coat (KRT71)
CC

More information on coat type genetics: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2897713/figure/F3/

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Traits genes:

Other Body Features

Trait
Result
 
Brachycephaly (BMP3)
CC
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
CT
Blue Eye Color
LINKAGE
N/N

Body Size

Body size is a complex trait that is affected by both genetic and environmental variation. Our genetic analysis includes genes that, together, explain over 80% of the variation in dog body size. It does not account for runting or stunting; nor does it account for the interactions between various genes both known and unknown.

Trait
Result
 
Body Size - IGF1
II
Body Size - IGF1R
GG
Body Size - STC2
TT
Body Size - GHR (E195K)
GA
Body Size - GHR (P177L)
CC

Other Embark dogs with these Body Size genes:

Performance

Trait
Result
 
Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
GG

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Family tree

Health

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Through Cooper’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

A230

Map

A1a

Cooper’s Haplogroup

A1a is the most common maternal lineage among Western dogs. This lineage traveled from the site of dog domestication in Central Asia to Europe along with an early dog expansion perhaps 10,000 years ago. It hung around in European village dogs for many millennia. Then, about 300 years ago, some of the prized females in the line were chosen as the founding dogs for several dog breeds. That set in motion a huge expansion of this lineage. It's now the maternal lineage of the overwhelming majority of Mastiffs, Labrador Retrievers and Gordon Setters. About half of Boxers and less than half of Shar-Pei dogs descend from the A1a line. It is also common across the world among village dogs, a legacy of European colonialism.

A230

Cooper’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, we have spotted this haplotype among village dogs in Peru. This haplotype does not occur in many breeds, but it occurs with high frequency in Labrador Retrievers and less frequently in Flat-Coated Retrievers and German Shepherd Dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Shar Pei dogs think A1a is the coolest!

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Family tree

Health

Traits

Paternal Haplotype

Through Cooper’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.15

Map

A1a

Cooper’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.15

Cooper’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this haplotype is found in village dogs from across the globe (outside of Asia). As for breeds, it is primarily seen in German Shepherds, Labrador Retrievers, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. It is by far the most common haplotype in German Shepherds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.

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Family tree

Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype