Cody

Mixed Breed

“Cody is a beloved family member who loves squeaky toys and watching dogs on tv, and is an emotional support animal for his human.”

Instagram tag
@spaceboy_cody

Place of Birth
Happy Valley, CA, USA
Current Location
Anderson, California, USA
From
Happy Valley, CA, USA

This dog has been viewed 2757 times and been given 161 wags

Registration

Microchip: 985112010246128

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

42.2% Basset Hound
20.9% Australian Cattle Dog
8.6% Labrador Retriever
8.1% Norwegian Elkhound
7.8% Rottweiler
6.7% American Staffordshire Terrier
5.7% German Shepherd Dog
Basset Hound Basset Hound
Basset Hounds are widely adored, short-legged and long-bodied hunting dogs that are considered great family companions.
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Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
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Labrador Retriever Labrador Retriever
The Labrador Retriever was bred for hunting and excelled in retrieving game after it was shot down. Known for its gentle disposition and loyalty, the Labrador Retriever has become a favorite of families and breeders alike.
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Norwegian Elkhound Norwegian Elkhound
The Norwegian Elkhound was the main companion of the Vikings. These guys have been used in almost every role imaginable for a dog. In modern times, they are primarily companion dogs, but they are still used for hunting and herding.
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Rottweiler Rottweiler
Originally used for driving cattle and protecting valuable convoys, Rottweilers are now popular family pets as well as guard, police and military dogs.
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American Staffordshire Terrier American Staffordshire Terrier
American Staffordshire Terriers are powerful but playful dogs that are both loyal and affectionate with their owners.
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German Shepherd Dog German Shepherd Dog
German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence. These are active working dogs who excel at many canine sports and tasks -- they are true utility dogs! Their versatility combined with their loyal companionship has them consistently listed as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.0 % LOW Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
29 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Cody’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Basset Hound
Australian Cattle Dog
Labrador Retriever
Norwegian Elkhound
Rottweiler
American Staffordshire Terrier
German Shepherd Dog
Changes to this dog’s profile
Learn More
  • On 6/4/2018 changed handle from "mateo2" to "cody57"
  • On 5/21/2018 changed name from "Mateo" to "Cody"

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Basset Hound mix Australian Cattle Dog / Norwegian Elkhound mix Labrador Retriever / German Shepherd Dog mix Basset Hound Basset Hound / Rottweiler mix Australian Cattle Dog Norwegian Elkhound mix Labrador Retriever mix German Shepherd Dog mix Basset Hound Basset Hound Basset Hound Rottweiler mix

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Cody’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Cody has one variant that you should let your vet know about.

ALT Activity

Cody inherited one copy of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Cody has one copy of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Cody has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Cody is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Cody’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs and German Shepherd Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Thrombopathia

Identified in Basset Hounds

Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type III, CLADIII

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Canine Elliptocytosis

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

Identified in Basset Hounds

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs, Norwegian Elkhounds, and more

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2, GR-PRA2

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in American Staffordshire Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd2

Identified in American Staffordshire Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Collie Eye Anomaly

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Day Blindness

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Day Blindness

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Glaucoma

Identified in Norwegian Elkhounds

Primary Lens Luxation

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Macular Corneal Dystrophy, MCD

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Cystinuria Type II-A

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in American Staffordshire Terriers, German Shepherd Dogs, and more

Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome, MPS VII

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in American Staffordshire Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 5

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Alexander Disease

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA

Identified in American Staffordshire Terriers

Narcolepsy

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Juvenile Laryngeal Paralysis and Polyneuropathy

Identified in Rottweilers

Centronuclear Myopathy

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Exercise-Induced Collapse

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Myotonia Congenita

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

X-Linked Myotubular Myopathy

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Hereditary Nasal Parakeratosis

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Skeletal Dysplasia 2, SD2

Identified in Labrador Retrievers

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

Identified in Basset Hounds

Chondrodystrophy

Identified in Norwegian Elkhounds

Additional Genetic Conditions

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Fawn Sable coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have little to no white in coat
Harlequin
hh
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Cody’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A247

Map

A1d

Cody’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A247

Cody’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1d haplogroup, this common haplotype occurs in village dogs all over the world. Among the 32 breeds we have sampled it in, the most common occurrences include Boxers, Labrador Retrievers, and Papillons.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

Through Cody’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.20

Map

A1a

Cody’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.20

Cody’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs in village dogs throughout the world (outside of Asia). It is quite common in breed dogs, occurring frequently in Golden Retrievers, Irish Wolfhounds, Scottish Terriers, Border Collies, and Mastiffs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.