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choupette

choupette CGC

Great Pyrenees

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“She’s from Northern California Great Pyrenees Rescue. When she first came, she hid all the time and was fearful of everything. Nowadays— watch out! She loves to throw-down and romp with almost every dog she meets and she’s always open for petting. She’s a vigilant guardian yet will look to our male Pyr to engage intruders as she likes to stay with her “flock,” (us or our animals). She has keen sensitivity and like our other Pyr was the best companion when we had sick parents.”

Place of Birth
Los Angeles, CA, USA
Current Location
California, USA
From
Dunnigan, CA, USA

This dog has been viewed 1505 times and been given 230 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Great Pyrenees

choupette CGC

embk.me/i/choupette3
Great Pyrenees Great Pyrenees
The Great Pyrenees is an exceptionally loving dog whose primary function is to protect sheep, goats, livestock, people, children, grass, flowers, the moon, lawn furniture, and any real or imaginary predators that may intrude on your personal space. They have a strong build and an amazing thick white coat that exudes elegance and majesty. They make a great family dog because of their intelligence and steady temperament.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

1.8 % HIGH Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
77 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

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Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Breed Reveal Video

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain choupette’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Through choupette’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

B1

Haplotype

B81

Map

B1

choupette’s Haplogroup

B1 is the second most common maternal lineage in breeds of European or American origin. It is the female line of the majority of Golden Retrievers, Basset Hounds, and Shih Tzus, and about half of Beagles, Pekingese and Toy Poodles. This lineage is also somewhat common among village dogs that carry distinct ancestry from these breeds. We know this is a result of B1 dogs being common amongst the European dogs that their conquering owners brought around the world, because nowhere on earth is it a very common lineage in village dogs. It even enables us to trace the path of (human) colonization: Because most Bichons are B1 and Bichons are popular in Spanish culture, B1 is now fairly common among village dogs in Latin America.

B81

choupette’s Haplotype

Part of the large B1 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in Shih Tzus, Chihuahuas, and Poodles.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The B1 haplogroup can be found in village dogs like the Peruvian Village Dog, pictured above.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that choupette inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since choupette is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.