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Chisum

Mixed Breed

“Chisum is a rescue dog from Oklahoma.”

Instagram tag
@makenna.dehart

Current Location
Manhattan, Kansas, USA
From
Prague, OK, USA

This dog has been viewed 1221 times and been given 1 wag

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

41.5% Cocker Spaniel
17.0% Border Collie
9.8% Golden Retriever
7.9% Chow Chow
4.4% German Shepherd Dog
4.1% Great Pyrenees
15.3% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Cocker Spaniel Cocker Spaniel
Cocker Spaniels are handsome and intelligent hunting dogs that are also well-suited to life as a loving family pet.
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Border Collie Border Collie
Border Collies are highly energetic and work oriented herding dogs, whose stamina is matched by their intelligence and alertness. If you want the smartest dog out there, then you have come to the right place!
Learn More
Golden Retriever Golden Retriever
Developed as an ideal hunting retriever, the Golden Retriever's eagerness to please and friendliness has made them an extremely popular family pet.
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Chow Chow Chow Chow
This distinctive-looking dog breed has a proud, independent spirit that some describe as catlike. Often aloof and suspicious of strangers, the Chow Chow may not be a cuddle buddy, but for the right person, they are a fiercely loyal companion.
Learn More
German Shepherd Dog German Shepherd Dog
German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence. These are active working dogs who excel at many canine sports and tasks -- they are true utility dogs! Their versatility combined with their loyal companionship has them consistently listed as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.
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Great Pyrenees Great Pyrenees
The Great Pyrenees is an exceptionally loving dog whose primary function is to protect sheep, goats, livestock, people, children, grass, flowers, the moon, lawn furniture, and any real or imaginary predators that may intrude on your personal space. They have a strong build and an amazing thick white coat that exudes elegance and majesty. They make a great family dog because of their intelligence and steady temperament.
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Start a conversation! Message this dog’s humans.

Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

1.4 % MEDIUM Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
48 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Chisum’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Cocker Spaniel
Border Collie
Golden Retriever
Chow Chow
German Shepherd Dog
Great Pyrenees
Supermutt
Changes to this dog’s profile
Learn More
  • On 1/13/2018 changed name from "Chisum " to "Chisum"

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Mixed Cocker Spaniel / Chow Chow mix Border Collie / Golden Retriever mix Cocker Spaniel mix Border Collie / Golden Retriever mix Cocker Spaniel Chow Chow mix Border Collie mix Golden Retriever mix Cocker Spaniel Mixed Border Collie mix Golden Retriever mix

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Chisum’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Chisum is at increased risk for one genetic health condition.

And inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

Chisum inherited both copies of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Chisum has two copies of an FGF4 retrogene on chromosome 12 and is at increased risk for Type I IVDD. Chisum would also be expected to have a chondrodystrophic phenotype (short legs relative to body length). Please consult with your veterinarian to discuss preventative and monitoring measures for Chisum.

What is Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)?

Chondrodystrophy (CDDY) refers to the relative proportions between dogs' legs and body. Dogs with chondrodystrophy have shorter legs and a longer body. An extreme example of this is a Dachshund or Corgi. Type I Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) refers to a health condition affecting the discs that act as cushions between vertebrae. With Type I IVDD, affected dogs can have a disc event where it ruptures or herniates towards the spinal cord. The pressure on the spinal cord causes neurologic symptoms.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Chisum inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd?

PRA-prcd is a retinal disease that causes progressive, non-painful vision loss in many breeds. The retina contains cells, called photoreceptors, that collect information about light and send signals to the brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, for night vision and movement, and cones, for day vision and color. This type of PRA leads to early loss of rod cells, leading to night blindness before day blindness.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in Border Collies and German Shepherd Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type III, CLAD3

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia Type I

Identified in Great Pyrenees

Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome

Identified in Border Collies

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 1, GR-PRA1

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2, GR-PRA2

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Collie Eye Anomaly

Identified in Border Collies

Day Blindness

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy

Identified in Great Pyrenees

Primary Lens Luxation

Identified in Border Collies

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Autosomal Recessive Hereditary Nephropathy, Familial Nephropathy, ARHN

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome, MPS VII

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Glycogen storage disease Type VII, Phosphofructokinase Deficiency, PFK Deficiency

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1, NCL 5

Identified in Border Collies

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs, Golden Retrievers, and more

Acral Mutilation Syndrome

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Muscular Dystrophy

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Exercise-Induced Collapse

Identified in Cocker Spaniels

Myotonia Congenita

Identified in Border Collies

Cobalamin Malabsorption

Identified in Border Collies

Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Ichthyosis

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Additional Genetic Conditions


Clinical Tools

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown fur coat
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely long coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely wavy coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Smaller
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Chisum’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A18/19/20/21/27/36/94/109

Map

A1b

Chisum’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A18/19/20/21/27/36/94/109

Chisum’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1b haplogroup, we see this haplotype in village dogs in over 25 countries across the world. We have detected this haplotype in lots of breeds, and it occurs most commonly in German Shepherd Dogs, Maltese, English Springer Spaniels, and English Setters.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

Through Chisum’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2a

Haplotype

Hc.5

Map

A2a

Chisum’s Haplogroup

A2a is a truly ancient lineage. Unlike the recent upstart A1 lineages which found their way from a few popular European males a couple hundred years ago into many dogs in many breeds, A2a shows ancient roots without major recent expansion. It is likely one of the oldest eastern Eurasian male lineages of dogs, where it has existed for thousands of years. Nowadays, it's commonly found in Tibetan Terriers and Chow Chows as well as in Southeastern Asian village dogs. The Chow Chow seems to have been depicted in sculpture over 2,000 years ago, so this is an ancient lineage indeed, and dogs with it have a long and noble pedigree! Males from this lineage have continued to be bred in similar forms and breeds for millennia.

Hc.5

Chisum’s Haplotype

Part of the A2a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Chow Chows and village dogs from Papua New Guinea.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The large-sized Tibetan Mastiff descends from this ancient lineage.