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“Chaser”
U CH Devenshires Let Freedom Ring v Doberman Fields U WP CGC ATTS TKN

Doberman Pinscher

Chat

“Chaser is a bundle of non-stop energy, happy wiggly body and tireless play!!”

Place of birth
California, USA
Location
Rock Tavern, NY, USA
From
Ohio, USA

This dog has been viewed 182 times and been given 1 wag

Registration

AKC: WS37993603
Microchip: 956000002506360

Genetic Breed Result

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Doberman Pinscher

Doberman Pinscher Doberman Pinscher
Doberman Pinscher’s are a strong and athletic breed that are built to guard and protect.
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 0.6 % LOW Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 92 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 66 human years Learn More

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Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Summary

0
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
162
CLEAR
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Clinical traits

These genetic traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal
This result helps your vet understand what your dog's baseline ALT activity is. The enzyme alanine aminotransferase, or ALT, is commonly used to evaluate liver health. Do…
Devenshires Let Freedom Ring v Doberman Fields has one copy of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please in…

Not At Risk

Good news! Chaser did not test positive for any of the genetic diseases that Embark screens for. Read on to learn more about the conditions we test for, but rest assured that Chaser does not have the mutations known to cause them.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Chaser’s diagnosis and treatment if he gets sick in the future. Many other diseases caused by environmental factors or undiscovered genetic variants can cause symptoms similar to diseases we test for. By ruling out these mutations, your veterinarian will be able to find the true cause more quickly. Your veterinarian will also know they can safely prescribe medications some dogs are sensitive to.

Not A Carrier

Good news! Chaser is not a carrier for any of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Chaser tested clear for 3 genetic conditions that are common in his breed.
Condition List

Von Willebrand Disease Type I
(VWF)
Blood

Coagulopathies, disorders of blood clotting, can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies are often at risk for excessive bleeding dur…

Degenerative Myelopathy
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Dilated Cardiomyopathy
(PDK4)
Heart

The most common acquired heart disease of dogs, this is a progressive disease of the heart ventricles: early diagnosis and treatment is key. The ventricles are the heavil…

Other Conditions: Clear of 159

Chaser is clear of 159 other genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

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Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Coat Color

A number of genes are known to affect coat color in dogs, and they all interact. In some cases, other genetic effects may also influence color and pattern.

Trait
Result
 
E Locus (Mask, Grizzle, Recessive Red)
EmE
K Locus (Dominant Black)
kyky
A Locus (Agouti, Sable)
atat
D Locus (Dilute, Blue, Fawn)
Dd
B Locus (Brown, Chocolate, Liver, Red, Dudley)
Bb

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Color genes:

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings, shedding and curls are all genetic! And they all interact, too. In fact, the combination of these genes explains the coat phenotypes of 90% of AKC registered dog breeds.

Trait
Result
 
Furnishings / Improper Coat (RSPO2)
II
Long Haircoat (FGF5)
GG
Shedding (MC5R)
TT
Curly Coat (KRT71)
CC
Hairlessness (FOXI3)
LINKAGE
N/N
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 - OCA2, Doberman Z Factor Albinism (SLC45A2)
LINKAGE
N/N

Other Body Features

Trait
Result
 
Brachycephaly (BMP3)
CC
Natural Bobtail (T)
CC
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
CC
Blue Eye Color
LINKAGE
N/N

Body Size

Body size is a complex trait that is affected by both genetic and environmental variation. Our genetic analysis includes genes that, together, explain over 80% of the variation in dog body size. It does not account for runting or stunting; nor does it account for the interactions between various genes both known and unknown.

Trait
Result
 
Body Size - IGF1
NN
Body Size - IGF1R
GG
Body Size - STC2
TT
Body Size - GHR (E195K)
GG
Body Size - GHR (P177L)
CC

Performance

Trait
Result
 
Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
GG

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Health

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Through Chaser’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A226

Map

A1e

Devenshires Let Freedom Ring v Doberman Fields’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A226

Devenshires Let Freedom Ring v Doberman Fields’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, we have spotted this haplotype in village dogs in Central and South America and Papua New Guinea. Among the 10 breeds we have detected it in, we see it most frequently in Border Collies, Doberman Pinschers, and Samoyeds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

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Health

Traits

Paternal Haplotype

Through Chaser’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

Ha.3

Map

A1b

Devenshires Let Freedom Ring v Doberman Fields’s Haplogroup

For most of dog history, this haplogroup was probably quite rare. However, a couple hundred years ago it seems to have found its way into a prized male guard dog in Europe who had many offspring, including the ancestors of many European guard breeds such as Doberman Pinchers, St. Bernards, and Great Danes. Despite being rare, many of the most imposing dogs on Earth have it; strangely, so do many Pomeranians! Perhaps this explains why some Poms are so tough, acting like they're ten times their actual size! This lineage is most commonly found in working dogs, in particular guard dogs. With origins in Europe, it spread widely across other regions as Europeans took their dogs across the world.

Ha.3

Devenshires Let Freedom Ring v Doberman Fields’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, this haplotype is found in village dogs in Peru and the French Polynesian Islands. It is also common among Doberman Pinscher, Saint Bernard, and Rhodesian Ridgeback.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Great Danes and Pomeranians have this in common!

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Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype