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Charlotte

American Foxhound

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“Adopted from a shelter. Found walking on a roadside. Deaf, but comes immediately when one gestures "come." Young. Sweet. Fast. Very curious. Likes to pull stuff off counters and lay on outside tabletop. Likes to dig. Circles and digs before she sleeps. Like to sleep in a tight circle next to my head. Will wedge herself between other dog and myself when going to sleep. May be a former hunting dog dumped because she is deaf.”

Current Location

Chase City, Virginia, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 12 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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American Foxhound

American Foxhounds, the American cousin of the English Foxhounds, are a lucky breed because their history and ancestry are well documented. They came over to the New World in 1650 with a man named Robert Brooke, who sailed from England to Crown Colony in North America (now modern day Maryland and Virginia). This pack of hunting dogs, beloved by the Brooke Family for hundreds of years, evolved to become the American Foxhound. The Brooke hounds were likely mixed with French hounds that were also brought to the Americas, and it was this mix of European breeds that eventually gave us our beloved American Foxhound.

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

0.3 % LOW

Predicted Adult Weight

42 lbs

Genetic Age
39 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

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Breed Reveal Video

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Charlotte’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Charlotte inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

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Charlotte inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

Because this variant is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner (meaning dogs need two copies of the variant to develop the disease), Charlotte is unlikely to develop this condition due to the variant.

What is Degenerative Myelopathy, DM?

The dog equivalent of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, DM is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord. Because the nerves that control the hind limbs are the first to degenerate, the most common clinical signs are back muscle wasting and gait abnormalities.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Factor VII Deficiency

Identified in American Foxhounds

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Charlotte’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A424

Map

A1d

Charlotte’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A424

Charlotte’s Haplotype

Part of the A1d haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in American Pit Bull Terriers, Barbets, and Staffordshire Terriers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Charlotte inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Charlotte is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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