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Char

Jindo

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“Being a Jindo, Char is more a cat than a dog. We came a long way since her adoption at the shelter 2 years ago where she was agressive; wouldn’t let anyone put a leash on her... She’s a smart regal dog and she knows it !”

Location
Los Angeles, California, USA
From
Harbor Animal Care Center, North Gaffey Street, San Pedro, CA, USA

This dog has been viewed 92 times and been given 2 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Jindo

100.0% Jindo
Jindo Jindo
The Jindo is a sptiz-type dog from Korea. These guys have been helping the Korean people hunt all types of game for thousands of years. Today, Jindos experience a much higher level of popularity in Korea than America.
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 2.5 % HIGH Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 62 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 41 human years Learn More

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Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Coat Color

A number of genes are known to affect coat color in dogs, and they all interact. In some cases, other genetic effects may also influence color and pattern.

Trait
Result
 
E Locus (Mask, Grizzle, Recessive Red)
ee
K Locus (Dominant Black)
kyky
A Locus (Agouti, Sable)
ayay
D Locus (Dilute, Blue, Fawn)
DD
B Locus (Brown, Chocolate, Liver, Red)
BB

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Color genes:

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings, shedding and curls are all genetic! And they all interact, too. In fact, the combination of these genes explains the coat phenotypes of 90% of AKC registered dog breeds.

Trait
Result
 
Furnishings / Improper Coat (RSPO2)
II
Long Haircoat (FGF5)
GG
Shedding (MC5R)
CT
Curly Coat (KRT71)
CC
Hairlessness (FOXI3)
LINKAGE
N/N

More information on coat type genetics: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2897713/figure/F3/

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Traits genes:

Other Body Features

Trait
Result
 
Brachycephaly (BMP3)
CC
Natural Bobtail (T)
CC
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
CC
Blue Eye Color
LINKAGE
N/N

Body Size

Body size is a complex trait that is affected by both genetic and environmental variation. Our genetic analysis includes genes that, together, explain over 80% of the variation in dog body size. It does not account for runting or stunting; nor does it account for the interactions between various genes both known and unknown.

Trait
Result
 
Body Size - IGF1
NN
Body Size - IGF1R
GG
Body Size - STC2
TT
Body Size - GHR (E195K)
GG
Body Size - GHR (P177L)
CC

Other Embark dogs with these Body Size genes:

Performance

Trait
Result
 
Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
GG

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Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Through Char’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A11a

Map

A1d

Char’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A11a

Char’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1d haplogroup, this common haplotype occurs in village dogs all over the world. Among the 23 breeds we have sampled it in, the most common occurrences include Rottweilers, English Setters, English Springer Spaniels, and wirehaired pointing griffons.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

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Traits

Paternal Haplotype

This 'Paternal Haplotype' tab is for deep ancestral lineage going back thousands of years.

For recent ancestry—"What breeds did my dog inherit from her mom and dad?"—please refer to the Breed, Family Tree, or Summary tab.

The Paternal Haplotype refers to a dog’s deep ancestral lineage stretching back thousands of years, before there were any distinct breeds of dog. We determine the Paternal Haplotype by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Char is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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Traits

Maternal Haplotype