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Bruce

Mixed Ancestry

“He loves to chase squirrels!”

Place of Birth

North Carolina, USA

Current Location

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

From

Washington, District of Columbia, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 733 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Beagle

The Beagle is a scent hound and a great family pet. They are known for being affectionate and having loud voices.

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Bluetick Coonhound

Bluetick Coonhounds are an American breed of hound that originated in the Southern United States, which is a pretty common story for American breeds, particularly hounds. While they can make good house dogs, Bluetick Coonhounds are still mostly hunting dogs.

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Australian Cattle Dog

A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.

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Russell-type Terrier

These small, energetic terriers, developed in 19th century England for hunting small game, are now some of the best agility dogs around.

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Dogs Like Bruce

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Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Bruce. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Beagle
Bluetick Coonhound
Australian Cattle Dog
Russell-type Terrier

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Here’s what Bruce’s family tree may have looked like.
While there may be other possible configurations of his family’s relationships, this is the most likely family tree to explain Bruce’s breed mix.
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Health Summary

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Bruce is at increased risk for two genetic health conditions.

And inherited two variants that you should learn more about.

Primary Lens Luxation

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Bruce inherited one copy of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Bruce has one copy of a variant in the ADAMTS17 gene and is at some risk for developing PLL. This variant is known to have an additive effect, so while dogs with one copy of the variant like Bruce have a higher risk than dogs with two healthy alleles at ADAMTS17, their risk is much lower than a dog with two copies of the variant. Actual risk associated with having one copy of this variant appears to vary in a breed-specific manner. A study published by Gould et al 2011 supports that Tibetan Terriers with one copy of the variant have minimal risk of developing PLL, whereas this risk can range from 2-20% in other terrier breeds. Please consult with your veterinarian to discuss the best ways to monitor Bruce's eyes and vision.

What is Primary Lens Luxation?

PLL occurs when the lens spontaneously detaches from its normal residence within the pupil, leading to reduced visual acuity. Anterior lens luxation is when the lens falls forward and posterior lens luxation is when the lens falls backwards in the eye.

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

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Bruce inherited one copy of the variant we tested

How to interpret this result

Bruce has one copy of an FGF4 retrogene on chromosome 12. In some breeds such as Beagles, Cocker Spaniels, and Dachshunds (among others) this variant is found in nearly all dogs. While those breeds are known to have an elevated risk of IVDD, many dogs in those breeds never develop IVDD. For mixed breed dogs and purebreds of other breeds where this variant is not as common, risk for Type I IVDD is greater for individuals with this variant than for similar dogs.

What is Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)?

Type I Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) is a back/spine issue that refers to a health condition affecting the discs that act as cushions between vertebrae. With Type I IVDD, affected dogs can have a disc event where it ruptures or herniates towards the spinal cord. This pressure on the spinal cord causes neurologic signs which can range from a wobbly gait to impairment of movement. Chondrodystrophy (CDDY) refers to the relative proportion between a dog’s legs and body, wherein the legs are shorter and the body longer. There are multiple different variants that can cause a markedly chondrodystrophic appearance as observed in Dachshunds and Corgis. However, this particular variant is the only one known to also increase the risk for IVDD.

Dilated Cardiomyopathy, DCM2

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Bruce inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

Our research indicates that this genetic variant is not likely to increase the risk that Bruce will develop this disease.

Scientific Basis

Dogs with similar breeds to Bruce are not likely to have increased risk of developing the disease. Research has indicated increased risk in other breeds that are not found in Bruce.

What is Dilated Cardiomyopathy, DCM2?

DCM is the most common acquired heart disease of adult dogs. The heart has two heavily muscled ventricles that pump blood away from the heart. This disease causes progressive weakening of the ventricles by reducing the muscle mass, which causes the ventricles to dilate. Dilated ventricles do not contract and circulate oxygenated blood well, which eventually leads to heart failure.

ALT Activity

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Bruce inherited one copy of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Bruce has one copy of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Bruce has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Bruce is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Bruce’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Factor VII Deficiency

Identified in Beagles

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

Identified in Beagles

Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, SCID

Identified in Russell-type Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd4/cord1

Identified in Beagles

Collie Eye Anomaly

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

Identified in Beagles

Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

Identified in Beagles

Cystinuria Type II-A

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in Russell-type Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 5, NCL 5

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 8, NCL 8

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Late-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis, NCL 12

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Enamel Hypoplasia

Identified in Russell-type Terriers

Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration

Identified in Beagles

Late Onset Spinocerebellar Ataxia

Identified in Russell-type Terriers

Spinocerebellar Ataxia with Myokymia and/or Seizures

Identified in Russell-type Terriers

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Identified in Russell-type Terriers

Myotonia Congenita

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Hypocatalasia, Acatalasemia

Identified in Beagles

Cobalamin Malabsorption

Identified in Beagles

Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome, CMS

Identified in Russell-type Terriers

Musladin-Lueke Syndrome, MLS

Identified in Beagles

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Identified in Beagles

Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Traits

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Bruce’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

B1

Haplotype

B63

Map

B1

Bruce’s Haplogroup

B1 is the second most common maternal lineage in breeds of European or American origin. It is the female line of the majority of Golden Retrievers, Basset Hounds, and Shih Tzus, and about half of Beagles, Pekingese and Toy Poodles. This lineage is also somewhat common among village dogs that carry distinct ancestry from these breeds. We know this is a result of B1 dogs being common amongst the European dogs that their conquering owners brought around the world, because nowhere on earth is it a very common lineage in village dogs. It even enables us to trace the path of (human) colonization: Because most Bichons are B1 and Bichons are popular in Spanish culture, B1 is now fairly common among village dogs in Latin America.

B63

Bruce’s Haplotype

Part of the large B1 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Golden Retrievers and village dogs in Vietnam.

The B1 haplogroup can be found in village dogs like the Peruvian Village Dog, pictured above.

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Through Bruce’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.53

Map

A1a

Bruce’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.53

Bruce’s Haplotype

Part of the A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in Golden Retrievers, Border Collies, and the Coton de Tulear.

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.

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