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Bobbie

Anatolian Shepherd Dog

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“Bobbie is a lean active female. She has an attitude though. Serious about resource guarding, food, space and dominant. She hated her 1/2 brother and was quite vicious. I kept them apart until they were a year old and she had been through one heat. Now she loves her 1/2 brother Amos who is several pounds heavier and an inch taller than her.”

Place of Birth

Wyoming, USA

Current Location

Colorado, USA

From

Wyoming, USA

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Genetic Breed Result

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Anatolian Shepherd Dog

The Anatolian Shepherd Dog is a native of Turkey, where he was developed as a shepherd’s companion and livestock guardian. He was bred to resemble the size and color of the livestock he defended so predators would not detect him among the flock. Sometimes called the Anatolian Karabash Dog, he’s a fiercely loyal guard dog and a large, impressive dog breed, weighing 120 to 150 pounds at maturity.

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Breed Reveal Video

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Bobbie’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Bobbie has one variant that you should let your vet know about.

ALT Activity

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Bobbie inherited both copies of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Bobbie has two copies of a variant in the GPT gene and is likely to have a lower than average baseline ALT activity. ALT is a commonly used measure of liver health on routine veterinary blood chemistry panels. As such, your veterinarian may want to watch for changes in Bobbie's ALT activity above their current, healthy, ALT activity. As an increase above Bobbie’s baseline ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Additional Genetic Conditions

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Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

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Other Coat Traits

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Other Body Features

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Body Size

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Performance

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Through Bobbie’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

D

Haplotype

D4

Map

D

Bobbie’s Haplogroup

D is a rare maternal line, which may be the result of an ancient dog breeding with another canid, possibly a wolf. It is found in Afghan Hounds and Scandinavian dog breeds.

D4

Bobbie’s Haplotype

A member of the small D haplogroup, this rare haplotype occurs in Afghan Hounds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Afghan Hounds are one of few breeds that descends from this rare maternal line.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Bobbie inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Bobbie is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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