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“Lynx”
Blue Cedar’s Lynx

Mixed Ancestry

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“Litter: Grace x Gumption (1)”

Place of Birth

Pahrump, NV, USA

Current Location

Pahrump, NV, USA

From

Pahrump, NV, USA

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Genetic Breed Result

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Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Whippet

The Whippet is a sighthound breed who can be counted on to speedily go after rabbits and other small game. While adept hunters today, Whippets also compete in agility, flyball, lure coursing, rally, and obedience. They are loving dogs, and their unique nature, friendly personality, and stylish looks make them a favorite as a family companion, as well as in the show ring.

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Border Collie

Border Collies are highly energetic and work-oriented herding dogs, whose stamina is matched by their intelligence and alertness. While they excel at the herding they were bred for, many Border Collies also enjoy flyball, obedience, and other canine sports. As long as they have a job to do and are physically and mentally stimulated, Border Collies can make excellent companions for the right owners.

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Border Terrier

The Border Terrier is a feisty terrier breed that was originally bred for assisting with foxhunts by flushing foxes out of their hiding places. Today, they’re primarily companions with a lot of personality. Though they come in a small package, Border Terriers have the drive and energy to dig, hunt, and play.

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Staffordshire Bull Terrier

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a hardy pup from England. This breed is very similar, and often confused with the American Pit Bull Terrier. These dogs get a bad wrap, but they so lovable and they absolutely adore their owners. It is a shame how history has treated them so cruely.

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Genetic Stats

Predicted Adult Weight

30 lbs

Genetic Age
21 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Whippet
Border Collie
Border Terrier
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
Unresolved

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Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 9/20/2021 changed handle from "smalllightermale" to "bluecedarslynx"
  • On 9/20/2021 changed name from "Lynx" to "Blue Cedar’s Lynx"
  • On 6/15/2021 changed name from "Small Lighter Male" to "Lynx"

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Health Summary

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Lynx inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Bald Thigh Syndrome

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Lynx inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

Because this variant is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner (meaning dogs need two copies of the variant to develop the disease), Lynx is unlikely to develop this condition due to the variant.

Impact on Breeding

Your dog carries this variant and will pass it on to ~50% of his offspring. You can email breeders@embarkvet.com to discuss with a genetic counselor how the genotype results should be applied to a breeding program.

What is Bald Thigh Syndrome?

A cosmetic condition common to sighthounds characterized by hair loss on the thighs. It is caused by a structural abnormality of the hair follicle.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Multiple Drug Sensitivity (ABCB1)

Identified in Border Collies and Whippets

Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome, TNS (VPS13B)

Identified in Border Collies

Collie Eye Anomaly (NHEJ1)

Identified in Border Collies

Goniodysgenesis and Glaucoma, Pectinate Ligament Dysplasia, PLD (OLFM3)

Identified in Border Collies

Primary Lens Luxation (ADAMTS17)

Identified in Border Collies

Glycogen storage disease Type VII, Phosphofructokinase Deficiency, PFK Deficiency (PFKM, Whippet and English Springer Spaniel Variant)

Identified in Whippets

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 5, NCL 5 (CLN5 Exon 4 SNP, Border Collie Variant)

Identified in Border Collies

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA (L2HGDH, Staffordshire Bull Terrier Variant)

Identified in Staffordshire Bull Terriers

Sensory Neuropathy (FAM134B, Border Collie Variant)

Identified in Border Collies

Bully Whippet Syndrome (MSTN)

Identified in Whippets

Myotonia Congenita (CLCN1 Exon 23, Australian Cattle Dog Variant)

Identified in Border Collies

Cobalamin Malabsorption (CUBN Exon 53, Border Collie Variant)

Identified in Border Collies

Raine Syndrome (FAM20C)

Identified in Border Collies

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Coat Color

Coat Color

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Lynx’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A236

Map

A1e

Blue Cedar’s Lynx’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A236

Blue Cedar’s Lynx’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Border Collies. It’s a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

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Through Lynx’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.53

Map

A1a

Blue Cedar’s Lynx’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.53

Blue Cedar’s Lynx’s Haplotype

Part of the A1a haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in Golden Retrievers, Border Collies, and the Coton de Tulear.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.

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