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Biggie Smalls

Miniature Pinscher

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“We rehomed this small dog with a big personality at 8 weeks. Now he's the rambuctious love of our lives. He has big ears, a lot of attitude, and is very social. He makes friends with everyone, very adventurous and active, and extremely smart and sassy. He’s known for being fashionable and charismatic. He's also not so mini for a min pin!”

Instagram tag
@goodboy_biggie

Place of Birth

Longueuil, Quebec, Canada

Current Location

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

From

Laval, Quebec, Canada

This dog has been viewed and been given 14 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Miniature Pinscher

The Miniature Pinscher is a small breed of dog originating from Germany. The breed's earliest ancestors may have included the German Pinscher mixed with Italian greyhounds and dachshunds.

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Breed Reveal Video

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Biggie Smalls’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Biggie Smalls has one variant that you should let your vet know about.

ALT Activity

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Biggie Smalls inherited one copy of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Biggie Smalls has one copy of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Biggie Smalls has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Biggie Smalls is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Biggie Smalls’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Cystinuria Type II-B

Identified in Miniature Pinschers

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Biggie Smalls’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2

Haplotype

A39

Map

A2

Biggie Smalls’s Haplogroup

A2 is a very ancient maternal line. Most likely it was one of the major female lines that contributed to the very first domesticated dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Some of the line stayed in Central Asia to the present day, and frequently appear as Tibetan Mastiffs and Akitas. Those that escaped the mountains of Central Asia sought out other cold spots, and are now found among Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies. This lineage is also occasionally found in several common Western breeds, such as German Shepherds and Labrador Retrievers. Curiously, all New Guinea Singing Dogs descend from this line. These are an ancient and very interesting breed found in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. Unfortunately, they are now endangered. They are closely related to the Australian dingo, so you could say its cousins are dingos! This line is also common in village dogs in Southeast and East Asia. Unlike many other lineages, A2 did not spread across the whole world, probably because it did not have the opportunity to hitch its wagon to European colonialism - or because these dogs just prefer hanging out in mountains, tundras, islands, and other hard-to-reach places!

A39

Biggie Smalls’s Haplotype

Part of the A2 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Akitas and Maltese.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dingos commonly possess this haplogroup.

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Through Biggie Smalls’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

Ha.44

Map

A1b

Biggie Smalls’s Haplogroup

For most of dog history, this haplogroup was probably quite rare. However, a couple hundred years ago it seems to have found its way into a prized male guard dog in Europe who had many offspring, including the ancestors of many European guard breeds such as Doberman Pinchers, St. Bernards, and Great Danes. Despite being rare, many of the most imposing dogs on Earth have it; strangely, so do many Pomeranians! Perhaps this explains why some Poms are so tough, acting like they're ten times their actual size! This lineage is most commonly found in working dogs, in particular guard dogs. With origins in Europe, it spread widely across other regions as Europeans took their dogs across the world.

Ha.44

Biggie Smalls’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, this haplotype occurs primarily in Poodles and Belgian Sheepdogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Great Danes and Pomeranians have this in common!

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