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Bennet Blassie

Mixed Breed

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“Mother: Stella (Saigon’s Stealth Bomber von Topper) / Father: Winston (Saigon’s Quaterback von Mr. Q)”

Place of Birth

White City, OR, USA

Current Location

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA

From

White City, OR, USA

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Genetic Breed Result

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Alaskan Malamute

The Alaskan Malamute is a large, fluffy spitz breed recognized as being one of the most ancient breeds of dogs. The forebears to the modern Malamute crossed the Bering Strait with their owners over 4,000 years ago. Their size, thick coat, and work drive make them ideal dogs for pulling sleds, but they also make amicable companions.

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German Shepherd Dog

German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence. These are active working dogs who excel at many canine sports and tasks -- they are true utility dogs! Their versatility combined with their loyal companionship has them consistently listed as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.

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Mastiff

Mastiffs are large but lovable dogs, known for their friendly and protective family characteristics.

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Irish Wolfhound

The Irish Wolfhound is about as big as they come. These gentle giants have served as hunting dogs for thousands of years. They make wonderful companions, especially for kids.

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

0 % LOW

Predicted Adult Weight

86 lbs

Genetic Age
21 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

Dogs Like Bennet Blassie

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Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Bennet Blassie. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Alaskan Malamute
German Shepherd Dog
Mastiff
Irish Wolfhound
Supermutt

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Changes to this dog’s profile
  • On 9/8/2020 changed name from "Bennet" to "Bennet Blassie"

Would you like more information? You can contact us at:

Bennet Blassie
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Mixed Alaskan Malamute / German Shepherd Dog mix Mastiff / Irish Wolfhound mix Alaskan Malamute / German Shepherd Dog mix Mastiff / Irish Wolfhound mix Alaskan Malamute German Shepherd Dog Mastiff Irish Wolfhound mix Alaskan Malamute German Shepherd Dog Mastiff mix Irish Wolfhound mix

Breed Reveal Video

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Bennet Blassie’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Bennet Blassie has one variant that you should let your vet know about.

ALT Activity

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Bennet Blassie inherited both copies of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Bennet Blassie has two copies of a variant in the GPT gene and is likely to have a lower than average baseline ALT activity. ALT is a commonly used measure of liver health on routine veterinary blood chemistry panels. As such, your veterinarian may want to watch for changes in Bennet Blassie's ALT activity above their current, healthy, ALT activity. As an increase above Bennet Blassie’s baseline ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the bloodstream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Factor VII Deficiency

Identified in Alaskan Malamutes

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Hemophilia A

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type III, CLAD III

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Platelet Factor X Receptor Deficiency, Scott Syndrome

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Day Blindness

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Autosomal Dominant Progressive Retinal Atrophy

Identified in Mastiffs

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy, cmr1

Identified in Mastiffs

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs and Mastiffs

Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome, MPS VII

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Identified in German Shepherd Dogs

Polyneuropathy, AMPN

Identified in Alaskan Malamutes

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Red Pigment Intensity LINKAGE
I (Intensity) Loci
Any light fur likely white or cream
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Fawn Sable coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have little to no white in coat
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Harlequin
No impact on coat pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation
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Through Bennet Blassie’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A25

Map

A1e

Bennet Blassie’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A25

Bennet Blassie’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, we have detected this haplotype in village dogs in Mexico. We also see it in Irish Wolfhounds, Great Pyrenees, Brittanys, and Labrador Retrievers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

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Through Bennet Blassie’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

D

Haplotype

H7.1/6/7

Map

D

Bennet Blassie’s Haplogroup

The D paternal lineage is very common in well-known populations of dogs. Breeds belonging to the D lineage likely have direct male ancestors that can be traced all the way back to the origin of domestic dogs themselves! One popular breed that commonly sports a D lineage is the Boxer. Boxers were developed in the late 19th century from Mastiff dogs, so it is no surprise that D is well represented among Mastiffs, Bulldogs, as well as Terriers. Intriguingly, D is also found among Lhasa Apsos, an ancient Tibetan breed, and Afghan Hounds. While the presence of this lineage in Polynesia or the New World can be chalked up to interbreeding with European dogs brought during voyages of discovery or later settlement, D is also well represented among village dog populations in the Middle East and Africa. If the fact that we find dogs bearing a D lineage in the Middle East (not to mention the large amount of diversity among Middle Eastern D lineage males) is any indication of ancient residence in that region, then the presence among Oceanian village dogs is peculiar. Rather, it may be that D is part of a broader Eurasian group of ancient paternal lineages which disappeared from the eastern portion of its original range, persisting in the island of New Guinea as well as West Asia and Africa. With the rise of Mastiff breeds, the D lineage received a new life as it became common among many types of working dogs.

H7.1/6/7

Bennet Blassie’s Haplotype

Part of the D haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in mixed breed dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The D paternal lineage is common in Boxers.

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