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Bella

Mixed Breed

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“Bella Liberty is a sweet loving smart dog who I rescued from Liberty Humane Society, March 2017 when she was about 3 years old weighing 16lbs. She loves treats and everyone stops in their cars to say how cute she is! I don't know much about her at all, except she was found out in a snow storm tied to a pole by a highway. Shes learning new things and exploring the world around her.”

Current Location

New Jersey, USA

From

Jersey City, New Jersey, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 7 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Bulldog

Originally a bull-baiting dog, bulldogs today are gentle and loving while still carrying the stocky frame of their forbearers.

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Staffordshire Terrier

Staffordshire Terriers, sometimes referred to as "pit bull" type, are intelligent and trainable dogs. They can have a lot of energy and are often great canine athletes!

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French Bulldog

French Bulldogs, affectionately known by their many fans as Frenchies, are an immensely popular and well-known breed of dog. As their name implies, they are native to France and are the result of a mix between English Bulldogs and local dogs in Paris. They are very popular around the world, earning their place as the 4th most popular dog in the United Kingdom and the 9th most popular dog in the United States.

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Dogs Like Bella

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Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Bella. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Bulldog
Staffordshire Terrier
French Bulldog

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Bella
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Bulldog mix Bulldog mix Bulldog French Bulldog / Staffordshire Terrier mix Bulldog French Bulldog / Staffordshire Terrier mix Bulldog Bulldog French Bulldog Staffordshire Terrier Bulldog Bulldog French Bulldog Staffordshire Terrier

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Bella’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Bella inherited two variants that you should learn more about.

Canine Multifocal Retinopathy, cmr1

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Bella inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Canine Multifocal Retinopathy, cmr1?

This is a non-progressive retinal disease that, in rare cases, can lead to vision loss. Dogs with larger lesions can suffer from vision loss. CMR is fairly non-progressive; new lesions will typically stop forming by the time a dog is an adult, and some lesions will even regress with time.

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

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Bella inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones?

This condition causes kidney and bladder stones composed of urate. In most dogs, uric acid is converted to allantoin, an inert substance that is then excreted in the urine. Dogs with HUU have defects in the pathway that converts uric acid to allantoin. As such, uric acid builds up, crystallizes and forms urate stones in the kidney and bladder. Uric acid is an intermediate of purine metabolism. While hyperuricemia in other species (including humans) can lead to painful conditions such as gout, dogs do not develop systemic signs of hyperuricemia.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in Staffordshire Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd2

Identified in Staffordshire Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd4/cord1

Identified in French Bulldogs

Hereditary Cataracts

Identified in French Bulldogs and Staffordshire Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in Staffordshire Terriers

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA

Identified in Staffordshire Terriers

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

Identified in French Bulldogs

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Body Size

Body Size

Performance

Performance

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Through Bella’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A315

Map

A1b

Bella’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A315

Bella’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1b haplogroup, we have spotted this haplotype in village dogs from Turkey and Fiji. Among breeds, it occurs most frequently in Vizslas, English Setters, and English Springer Spaniels.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

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The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Bella inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Bella is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

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