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Baze Malbus CGC

Mixed Breed

“He loves wearing hoodies! He's a talkative, gentle boy who has a bad habit of letting the cats eat his food.”

Place of Birth
Yakima, Washington, USA
Current Location
Kirkland, Washington, USA
From
Bellevue, WA, USA

This dog has been viewed 2084 times and been given 4 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Mixed Breed

50.5% Cane Corso
18.9% Boxer
9.3% Neapolitan Mastiff
6.9% American Bulldog
6.0% Rottweiler
4.5% Mastiff
3.9% German Shepherd Dog
Cane Corso Cane Corso
Cane Corsos are strong working dogs, also acting as loyal and protective companion dogs.
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Boxer Boxer
Developed in Germany, the Boxer is a popular family dog-patient, loyal and smart-requiring lots of exercise and proper training.
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Neapolitan Mastiff Neapolitan Mastiff
The Neapolitan Mastiff dog breed is a family and guard dog who was developed in southern Italy. Today this massive breed is known as a gentle giant.
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American Bulldog American Bulldog
American bulldogs are enjoying a healthy increase in popularity, either as a working/protector dog or as a family pet. All over the world, they are used variously as "hog dogs" (catching escaped pigs or hunting razorbacks), as cattle drovers and as working or sport K-9s. American Bulldogs also successfully compete in several dog sports such as dog obedience, Iron Dog competition and weight pulling.
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Rottweiler Rottweiler
Originally used for driving cattle and protecting valuable convoys, Rottweilers are now popular family pets as well as guard, police and military dogs.
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Mastiff Mastiff
Mastiffs are large but lovable dogs, known for their friendly and protective family characteristics.
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German Shepherd Dog German Shepherd Dog
German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence. These are active working dogs who excel at many canine sports and tasks -- they are true utility dogs! Their versatility combined with their loyal companionship has them consistently listed as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.3 % LOW Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
32 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Baze Malbus’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Cane Corso
Boxer
Neapolitan Mastiff
American Bulldog
Rottweiler
Mastiff
German Shepherd Dog
Changes to this dog’s profile
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  • On 3/7/2019 changed name from "Baze" to "Baze Malbus"

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Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Cane Corso mix Mixed Cane Corso Boxer / American Bulldog mix Cane Corso / Neapolitan Mastiff mix Boxer / Mastiff mix Cane Corso Cane Corso Boxer mix American Bulldog mix Cane Corso Neapolitan Mastiff mix Boxer Mastiff mix

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Baze Malbus’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Through Baze Malbus’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A275

Map

A1e

Baze Malbus’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A275

Baze Malbus’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Neapolitan Mastiffs. It’s a rare find!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

Through Baze Malbus’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

D

Haplotype

H10.1

Map

D

Baze Malbus’s Haplogroup

The D paternal lineage is very common in well-known populations of dogs. Breeds belonging to the D lineage likely have direct male ancestors that can be traced all the way back to the origin of domestic dogs themselves! One popular breed that commonly sports a D lineage is the Boxer. Boxers were developed in the late 19th century from Mastiff dogs, so it is no surprise that D is well represented among Mastiffs, Bulldogs, as well as Terriers. Intriguingly, D is also found among Lhasa Apsos, an ancient Tibetan breed, and Afghan Hounds. While the presence of this lineage in Polynesia or the New World can be chalked up to interbreeding with European dogs brought during voyages of discovery or later settlement, D is also well represented among village dog populations in the Middle East and Africa. If the fact that we find dogs bearing a D lineage in the Middle East (not to mention the large amount of diversity among Middle Eastern D lineage males) is any indication of ancient residence in that region, then the presence among Oceanian village dogs is peculiar. Rather, it may be that D is part of a broader Eurasian group of ancient paternal lineages which disappeared from the eastern portion of its original range, persisting in the island of New Guinea as well as West Asia and Africa. With the rise of Mastiff breeds, the D lineage received a new life as it became common among many types of working dogs.

H10.1

Baze Malbus’s Haplotype

Part of the D haplogroup, this widespread haplotype occurs frequently in Boxers, Chinese Shar-pei, Croatian Shepherds, and village dogs throughout the South Pacific and southeast Asia.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The D paternal lineage is common in Boxers.