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Baxter

Mixed Breed

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No bio has been provided yet

Place of Birth

Flagstaff, Arizona, USA

Current Location

Eloy, Arizona, USA

From

Flagstaff, AZ, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 2 wags

Genetic Breed Result

German Shepherd Dog

German Shepherds are confident, courageous dogs with a keen sense of smell and notable intelligence. These are active working dogs who excel at many canine sports and tasks -- they are true utility dogs! Their versatility combined with their loyal companionship has them consistently listed as one of the most popular breeds in the United States.

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Great Dane

Great Danes are large lovable dogs that need exercise and space. Many Great Danes are "leaners"-- they lean against their people to be closer to them, seemingly oblivious to their size!

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

0.9 % MEDIUM

Predicted Adult Weight

92 lbs

Genetic Age
22 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

Dogs Like Baxter

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Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Baxter. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
German Shepherd Dog
Great Dane

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Breed Reveal Video

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Baxter’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.

Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Dark brown pigment
Cocoa
No impact on fur and skin color
Red Pigment Intensity LINKAGE
I (Intensity) Loci
No impact on coat pattern
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown fur coat
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
White Spotting
S (White Spotting) Locus
Likely to have little to no white in coat
Roan LINKAGE
R (Roan) Locus
Likely no impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Harlequin
No impact on coat pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Larger
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation
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Through Baxter’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A2

Haplotype

A29a

Map

A2

Baxter’s Haplogroup

A2 is a very ancient maternal line. Most likely it was one of the major female lines that contributed to the very first domesticated dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Some of the line stayed in Central Asia to the present day, and frequently appear as Tibetan Mastiffs and Akitas. Those that escaped the mountains of Central Asia sought out other cold spots, and are now found among Alaskan Malamutes and Siberian Huskies. This lineage is also occasionally found in several common Western breeds, such as German Shepherds and Labrador Retrievers. Curiously, all New Guinea Singing Dogs descend from this line. These are an ancient and very interesting breed found in the mountains of Papua New Guinea. Unfortunately, they are now endangered. They are closely related to the Australian dingo, so you could say its cousins are dingos! This line is also common in village dogs in Southeast and East Asia. Unlike many other lineages, A2 did not spread across the whole world, probably because it did not have the opportunity to hitch its wagon to European colonialism - or because these dogs just prefer hanging out in mountains, tundras, islands, and other hard-to-reach places!

A29a

Baxter’s Haplotype

Part of the A2 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in Siberian Huskies, Alaskan Malamutes, Labrador Retrievers, and village dogs from Alaska.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dingos commonly possess this haplogroup.

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Through Baxter’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

Ha.43

Map

A1b

Baxter’s Haplogroup

For most of dog history, this haplogroup was probably quite rare. However, a couple hundred years ago it seems to have found its way into a prized male guard dog in Europe who had many offspring, including the ancestors of many European guard breeds such as Doberman Pinchers, St. Bernards, and Great Danes. Despite being rare, many of the most imposing dogs on Earth have it; strangely, so do many Pomeranians! Perhaps this explains why some Poms are so tough, acting like they're ten times their actual size! This lineage is most commonly found in working dogs, in particular guard dogs. With origins in Europe, it spread widely across other regions as Europeans took their dogs across the world.

Ha.43

Baxter’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, the Ha.43 haplotype occurs most commonly in Great Danes, Portuguese Podengo Pequenos and Rhodesian Ridgebacks. We've also spotted it in American Village Dogs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Great Danes and Pomeranians have this in common!

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