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Baby Babette

West Highland White Terrier

“Sweetest dog. Loves to sleep and bark at dogs on the tv. She follows me every where I go. She never turns down a snack.”

Place of Birth
Unknown
Current Location
Ridgefield, Connecticut, USA
From
Yonkers, New York, USA

This dog has been viewed 328 times and been given 3 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

West Highland White Terrier

100.0% West Highland White Terrier
West Highland White Terrier West Highland White Terrier
Westies are confident and friendly terriers, with an intelligent and curious mind that requires both mental and physical stimulation to become a well-rounded dog.
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Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

0.9 % MEDIUM Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
58 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

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Health Summary

Baby Babette has one variant that you should let your vet know about.

ALT Activity

Baby Babette inherited both copies of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Baby Babette has two copies of a variant in the GPT gene and is likely to have a lower than average baseline ALT activity. ALT is a commonly used measure of liver health on routine veterinary blood chemistry panels. As such, your veterinarian may want to watch for changes in Baby Babette's ALT activity above their current, healthy, ALT activity. As an increase above Baby Babette’s baseline ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

The liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase, or ALT, is one of several values your veterinarian measures on routine blood work to gauge liver health.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Von Willebrand Disease Type I

Identified in West Highland White Terriers

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

Identified in West Highland White Terriers

Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy, Krabbe disease

Identified in West Highland White Terriers

Craniomandibular Osteopathy, CMO

Identified in West Highland White Terriers

Additional Genetic Conditions

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance, size, and genetic diversity.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Light colored fur (cream to red)
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Likely black colored nose/feet
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
No impact on coat color
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark fur anywhere
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
No impact on coat color
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely furnished (mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely light shedding
Coat Texture
Coat would likely be curly or wavy if long
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Likely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Smaller
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Baby Babette’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A26a/305

Map

A1d

Baby Babette’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A26a/305

Baby Babette’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1d haplogroup, we have not yet detected this haplotype in any of our village dogs. Among the 6 breeds we see it in, it appears most frequently in Newfoundlands, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, and soft coated Wheaten Terriers.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Baby Babette inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Baby Babette is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.