What is Embark?

HRH Aussie

Mixed Breed

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Aussie posing for a glam shot

“An adorable, mischievous furball of fun. Adopted from MSPCA in Boston who told us he is a bichon-poodle, it turns out he’s actually a schnoodle!”

Location
Boston, Massachusetts, USA

This dog has been viewed 4654 times and been given 26 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

55.8% Poodle (Small)
20.8% Miniature Schnauzer
10.9% Pekingese
12.5% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from this distant ancestor:

Poodle (Small) Poodle (Small)
A highly intelligent and playful dog, Miniature and Toy Poodles make for great lap dogs and companions.
Learn More
Miniature Schnauzer Miniature Schnauzer
Miniature Schnauzers are an alert and spirited breed with guard dog tendencies.
Learn More
Pekingese Pekingese
Pekingese were dogs bred for centuries to be the prized companions of the imperial family of China. Today they are still cherished family companions and show dogs who greet everyone they meet with dignity and grace.
Learn More
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 0.3 % LOW Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 17 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 44 human years Learn More

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Aussie’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Poodle (Small)
Miniature Schnauzer
Pekingese
Supermutt

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Family tree

Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Poodle (Small) mix Poodle (Small) mix Poodle (Small) Miniature Schnauzer / Pekingese mix Poodle (Small) Miniature Schnauzer / Pekingese mix Poodle (Small) Poodle (Small) Miniature Schnauzer Pekingese mix Poodle (Small) Poodle (Small) Miniature Schnauzer mix Pekingese mix
Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Aussie’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Summary

0
AT RISK
0
CARRIER
167
CLEAR
Tap above or scroll down to see more

Clinical traits

These genetic traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal
This result helps your vet understand what your dog's baseline ALT activity is. The enzyme alanine aminotransferase, or ALT, is commonly used to evaluate liver health. Do…
Aussie has one copy of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Aussie has t…

Not At Risk

Good news! Aussie did not test positive for any of the genetic diseases that Embark screens for. Read on to learn more about the conditions we test for, but rest assured that Aussie does not have the mutations known to cause them.

It is still important to let your veterinarian know these results because they could help guide Aussie’s diagnosis and treatment if he gets sick in the future. Many other diseases caused by environmental factors or undiscovered genetic variants can cause symptoms similar to diseases we test for. By ruling out these mutations, your veterinarian will be able to find the true cause more quickly. Your veterinarian will also know they can safely prescribe medications some dogs are sensitive to.

Not A Carrier

Good news! Aussie is not a carrier for any of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

Common Conditions

Good news! Aussie tested clear for 9 genetic conditions that are common in his breed mix.
Condition List

Von Willebrand Disease Type I
(VWF)
Blood

Coagulopathies, disorders of blood clotting, can lead to symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopathies are often at risk for excessive bleeding dur…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Aussie.

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia
(TUBB1 Exon 1, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Variant)
Blood

This is a benign disorder of platelet production that leads to abnormally large, sparse platelets. Affected dogs typically do not suffer any ill effects from the size or …

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Aussie.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - prcd
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
Eyes

This retinal disease causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains the cells, photoreceptors, that collect information about light: that is, they are t…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Aussie.

GM2 Gangliosidosis
(HEXB, Poodle Variant)
Multisystem

An early onset form of lysosomal storage disease, this can cause affected dogs to display neurologic signs as puppies or young adults. These include partial or total visi…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Aussie.

Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome
(AMHR2)
Other Systems

A developmental syndrome of the Miniature and Standard Schnauzers, this causes male dogs to develop parts of the female reproductive tract, which understandably can cause…

Seen in Miniature Schnauzers, but not Aussie.

Degenerative Myelopathy
(SOD1A)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, Miniature Schnauzers, Pekingeses, but not Aussie.

Neonatal Encephalopathy with Seizures (NEWS)
(ATF2)
Brain and Spinal Cord

A neurologic disease of puppies, affected puppies are often smaller than their unaffected littermates and require intensive nursing care. Without this extra support, pupp…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Aussie.

Myotonia Congenita
(CLCN1 Exon 7)
Muscular

This condition is characterized by prolonged muscle contraction and stiffness that usually resolves with normal exercise, though physical therapy can be beneficial. The g…

Seen in Miniature Schnauzers, but not Aussie.

Osteochondrodysplasia, Skeletal Dwarfism
(SLC13A1)
Skeletal

A form of skeletal dwarfism, this causes affected dogs to have abnormally short legs but a normal sized body due to abnormal fetal skeletal maturation. As a fetus, most o…

Seen in Poodle (Small)s, but not Aussie.

Other Conditions: Clear of 158

Aussie is clear of 158 other genetic diseases that Embark tests for.

Explore:

Family tree

Traits

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

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Coat Color

A number of genes are known to affect coat color in dogs, and they all interact. In some cases, other genetic effects may also influence color and pattern.

Trait
Result
 
E Locus (Mask, Grizzle, Recessive Red)
ee
K Locus (Dominant Black)
kyky
A Locus (Agouti, Sable)
ayat
D Locus (Dilute, Blue, Fawn)
DD
B Locus (Brown, Chocolate, Liver, Red, Dudley)
Bb

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Color genes:

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings, shedding and curls are all genetic! And they all interact, too. In fact, the combination of these genes explains the coat phenotypes of 90% of AKC registered dog breeds.

Trait
Result
 
Furnishings / Improper Coat (RSPO2)
FF
Long Haircoat (FGF5)
TT
Shedding (MC5R)
CT
Curly Coat (KRT71)
CT
Hairlessness (FOXI3)
LINKAGE
N/N
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 - OCA2, Doberman Z Factor Albinism (SLC45A2)
LINKAGE
N/N

More information on coat type genetics: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2897713/figure/F3/

Other Embark dogs with these Coat Traits genes:

Other Body Features

Trait
Result
 
Brachycephaly (BMP3)
CC
Natural Bobtail (T)
CC
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
CC
Blue Eye Color
LINKAGE
N/N

Body Size

Body size is a complex trait that is affected by both genetic and environmental variation. Our genetic analysis includes genes that, together, explain over 80% of the variation in dog body size. It does not account for runting or stunting; nor does it account for the interactions between various genes both known and unknown.

Trait
Result
 
Body Size - IGF1
II
Body Size - IGF1R
GG
Body Size - STC2
TA
Body Size - GHR (E195K)
GG
Body Size - GHR (P177L)
CC

Other Embark dogs with these Body Size genes:

Performance

Trait
Result
 
Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
GG

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Family tree

Health

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Through Aussie’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1e

Haplotype

A373

Map

A1e

Aussie’s Haplogroup

This female lineage likely stems from some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs starting about 15,000 years ago. It seemed to be a fairly rare dog line for most of dog history until the past 300 years, when the lineage seemed to “explode” out and spread quickly. What really separates this group from the pack is its presence in Alaskan village dogs and Samoyeds. It is possible that this was an indigenous lineage brought to the Americas from Siberia when people were first starting to make that trip themselves! We see this lineage pop up in overwhelming numbers of Irish Wolfhounds, and it also occurs frequently in popular large breeds like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Shetland Sheepdogs are also common members of this maternal line, and we see it a lot in Boxers, too. Though it may be all mixed up with European dogs thanks to recent breeding events, its origins in the Americas makes it a very exciting lineage for sure!

A373

Aussie’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1e haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most commonly in village dogs in Costa Rica.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Irish Wolfhounds are a consistent carrier of A1e.

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Family tree

Health

Traits

Paternal Haplotype

Through Aussie’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1

Haplotype

Ha.1

Map

A1

Aussie’s Haplogroup

A1 is the male lineage in several breeds that aren't very closely related to each other. Gordon Setters, Newfoundlands, and Miniature Schnauzers all had male founders from this paternal line, and now many males in those breeds carry their Y chromosome. Each of these breeds started in the past 200-300 years, and their founders must have included dogs that trace back to the same male ancestors deeper in dog evolutionary time, stretching all the way back to when dogs were first domesticated in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Unlike many Y chromosome (male) lineages found in European and recent American breeds, only one village dog (in Alaska) carries an A1 Y chromosome, indicating that the breeds from this lineage probably didn't travel around the world with European colonization as much as some other breeds.

Ha.1

Aussie’s Haplotype

The lone member of the A1 haplogroup, this haplotype occurs in Newfoundlands, Miniature Schnauzers, Gordon Setters, and village dogs in Alaska.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The Newfoundland is from the A1 paternal line.

Explore:

Family tree

Health

Traits

Maternal Haplotype