Aurora

Goldendoodle

“Rhea and Hooch F1 Goldendoodle”

Place of Birth
Jefferson City, MO, USA
Current Location
Columbia, Missouri, USA

This dog has been viewed 60 times and been given 0 wags

Registration

UABR: 1B9D90-08 D

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Goldendoodle

50.0% Golden Retriever
50.0% Poodle (Standard)
Golden Retriever Golden Retriever
Developed as an ideal hunting retriever, the Golden Retriever's eagerness to please and friendliness has made them an extremely popular family pet.
Learn More
Poodle (Standard) Poodle (Standard)
Known as the national dog breed of France, poodles were developed in Germany and are known for their loyalty and distinctive coat.
Learn More
Start a conversation! Message this dog’s owner.

Genetic Stats


Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
25 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Aurora’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Golden Retriever
Poodle (Standard)

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Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Breed Reveal Video

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Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Aurora’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Aurora inherited two variants that you should learn more about.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

Aurora inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result should not impact Aurora’s health but it could have consequences for siblings or other related dogs if they inherited two copies of the variant. We recommend discussing this result with their owners or breeders if you are in contact.

Impact on Breeding

Your dog carries this variant and will pass it on to ~50% of her offspring.

What is Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd?

PRA-prcd is a retinal disease that causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains cells, called photoreceptors, that collect information about light and send signals to the brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, for night vision and movement, and cones, for day vision and color. This type of PRA leads to early loss of rod cells, leading to night blindness before day blindness.


Ichthyosis

Aurora inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result should not impact Aurora’s health but it could have consequences for siblings or other related dogs if they inherited two copies of the variant. We recommend discussing this result with their owners or breeders if you are in contact.

Impact on Breeding

Your dog carries this variant and will pass it on to ~50% of her offspring.

What is Ichthyosis?

This skin disorder gets its name from the thick, darkly pigmented scales of skin ("ichthys" is Greek for "fish") that affected dogs display on their noses, paw pads, and muzzles.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Von Willebrand Disease Type I (VWF)

Identified in Standard Poodles

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 1, GR-PRA1 (SLC4A3)

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2, GR-PRA2 (TTC8)

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (CLN5 Golden Retriever Variant)

Identified in Golden Retrievers

GM2 Gangliosidosis (HEXB, Poodle Variant)

Identified in Standard Poodles

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM (SOD1A)

Identified in Golden Retrievers and Standard Poodles

Neonatal Encephalopathy with Seizures, NEWS (ATF2)

Identified in Standard Poodles

Muscular Dystrophy (DMD Golden Retriever Variant)

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (COL7A1)

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Osteogenesis Imperfecta (COL1A1)

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Osteochondrodysplasia (SLC13A1)

Identified in Standard Poodles

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I) (FGF4 retrogene - CFA12)

Identified in Standard Poodles

Additional Genetic Conditions


Clinical Tools

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Coat Color

Coat Color

E Locus (MC1R)
No dark hairs anywhere (ee)
K Locus (CBD103)
Not expressed (KBKB)
Intensity Loci LINKAGE
Any pigmented hair likely yellow or tan (Intermediate Red Pigmentation)
A Locus (ASIP)
Not expressed (aa)
D Locus (MLPH)
Not expressed (DD)
B Locus (TYRP1)
Likely black colored nose/feet (BB)
Saddle Tan (RALY)
Not expressed (NN)
S Locus (MITF)
Likely solid colored, but may have small amounts of white (Ssp)
M Locus (PMEL)
No merle alleles (mm)
H Locus (Harlequin)
No harlequin alleles (hh)
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings (RSPO2) LINKAGE
Likely furnished (mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows) (FI)
Coat Length (FGF5)
Likely long coat (TT)
Shedding (MC5R)
Likely light shedding (CT)
Coat Texture (KRT71)
Likely wavy coat (CT)
Hairlessness (FOXI3) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Hairlessness (SGK3)
Very unlikely to be hairless (NN)
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 (SLC45A2) LINKAGE
Likely not albino (NN)
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length (BMP3)
Likely medium or long muzzle (CC)
Tail Length (T)
Likely normal-length tail (CC)
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1)
Unlikely to have hind dew claws (CC)
Blue Eye Color (ALX4) LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes (NN)
Back Muscling & Bulk, Large Breed (ACSL4)
Likely normal muscling (CC)
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size (IGF1)
Larger (NN)
Body Size (IGFR1)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (STC2)
Larger (TT)
Body Size (GHR - E191K)
Larger (GG)
Body Size (GHR - P177L)
Larger (CC)
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1)
Normal altitude tolerance (GG)
Appetite (POMC) LINKAGE
Normal food motivation (NN)

Through Aurora’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A361/409/611

Map

A1b

Aurora’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A361/409/611

Aurora’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in German Shepherd Dogs, Poodles, and Shiloh Shepherds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Aurora inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Aurora is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.