Embark logo

Aspen

Siberian Husky

“Aspen helps me rehabilitate and train shelter dogs and is the mascot of Haunani's Training Services. She's learning mushing and shows promise as a lead dog. She's sweet, goofy, and loves to talk back.”

Instagram tag
@Aspenthehuskyroo

This dog has been viewed 1137 times and been given 7 wags

Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Siberian Husky

100.0% Siberian Husky
Siberian Husky Siberian Husky
Bred initially in Northern Siberia, the Siberian Husky is a medium-sized working dog who is quick and light on their feet. Their moderately compact and well furred body, erect ears and brush tail suggest their Northern heritage. Huskies are very active and energetic and are known for being long distance sled dogs.
Learn More
Start a conversation! Message this dog’s humans.

Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

2.0 % HIGH Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight
Genetic Age
44 human years Learn More
Based on the date of birth provided

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Aspen’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Aspen inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1

Aspen inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1?

PRA-CRD4/cord1 is a retinal disease that causes progressive, non-painful vision loss over a 1-2 year period. The retina contains cells, called photoreceptors, that collect information about light and send signals to the brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, for night vision and movement, and cones, for day vision and color. This type of PRA leads to early loss of cone cells, causing day blindness before night blindness.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

GM1 Gangliosidosis

Identified in Siberian Huskies

Additional Genetic Conditions


Clinical Tools

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have patterned fur
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
Agouti (Wolf Sable) coat color pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
No dark mask or grizzle facial fur patterns
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Eye Color LINKAGE
Likely to have blue eyes or partial blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Intermediate
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Larger
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Aspen’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

A266

Map

A1a

Aspen’s Haplogroup

A1a is the most common maternal lineage among Western dogs. This lineage traveled from the site of dog domestication in Central Asia to Europe along with an early dog expansion perhaps 10,000 years ago. It hung around in European village dogs for many millennia. Then, about 300 years ago, some of the prized females in the line were chosen as the founding dogs for several dog breeds. That set in motion a huge expansion of this lineage. It's now the maternal lineage of the overwhelming majority of Mastiffs, Labrador Retrievers and Gordon Setters. About half of Boxers and less than half of Shar-Pei dogs descend from the A1a line. It is also common across the world among village dogs, a legacy of European colonialism.

A266

Aspen’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this uncommon haplotype occurs in dogs with European ancestry.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Shar Pei dogs think A1a is the coolest!

The Paternal Haplotype reveals a dog’s deep ancestral lineage, stretching back thousands of years to the original domestication of dogs.

Are you looking for information on the breeds that Aspen inherited from her mom and dad? Check out her breed breakdown and family tree.

Paternal Haplotype is determined by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Aspen is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.