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Ace

Mixed Breed

“We adopted our little Ace from Save Korean Dogs in S Korea. Ace had escaped from a dog meat farm on an island and walked into an elderly woman's house when he was starving. She made him rice and got him help. While he was at the shelter he was known for his backwards front feet and for barking at the rain every night. When he arrived in Oregon he jumped in my arms, and he hasn't wanted to walk since! He loves snuggles and belly rubs. He gets grumpy at night and often sleeps in my arms.”

Place of Birth
South Korea
Current Location
Dallas, Oregon, USA
From
South Korea

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Genetic Breed Result

Learn how it’s done

Mixed Breed

24.4% Beagle
20.6% Shih Tzu
55.0% Supermutt

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

Beagle Beagle
The Beagle is a scent hound and a great family pet. They are known for being affectionate and having loud voices.
Learn More
Shih Tzu Shih Tzu
This ancient breed is the perfect lapdog. Sweet and easygoing, they want nothing more than to be close to their humans.
Learn More
Start a conversation! Message this dog’s humans.

Genetic Stats


Wolfiness

2.1 % HIGH Learn More

Predicted Adult Weight

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Ace’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Beagle
Shih Tzu
Supermutt

Would you like more information? Have you found a lost dog wearing an Embark dog tag? You can contact us at:

Explore by tapping the parents and grandparents.
 
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Mixed Beagle mix Shih Tzu mix Mixed Beagle Mixed Shih Tzu Shih Tzu mix Mixed Mixed Beagle Beagle Mixed Mixed

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Ace’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

Health Summary

Ace inherited one variant that you should learn more about.

And one variant that you should tell your vet about.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1

Ace inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Progressive Retinal Atrophy - crd4/cord1?

PRA-CRD4/cord1 is a retinal disease that causes progressive, non-painful vision loss over a 1-2 year period. The retina contains cells, called photoreceptors, that collect information about light and send signals to the brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, for night vision and movement, and cones, for day vision and color. This type of PRA leads to early loss of cone cells, causing day blindness before night blindness.


ALT Activity

Ace inherited one copy of the variant we tested

Why is this important to your vet?

Ace has one copy of a variant associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform your veterinarian that Ace has this genotype, as ALT is often used as an indicator of liver health and Ace is likely to have a lower than average resting ALT activity. As such, an increase in Ace’s ALT activity could be evidence of liver damage, even if it is within normal limits by standard ALT reference ranges.

What is ALT Activity?

Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is a clinical tool that can be used by veterinarians to better monitor liver health. This result is not associated with liver disease. ALT is one of several values veterinarians measure on routine blood work to evaluate the liver. It is a naturally occurring enzyme located in liver cells that helps break down protein. When the liver is damaged or inflamed, ALT is released into the blood stream.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

Factor VII Deficiency

Identified in Beagles

Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia

Identified in Shih Tzus

Prekallikrein Deficiency

Identified in Shih Tzus

Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency

Identified in Beagles

Glaucoma

Identified in Beagles

Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration

Identified in Beagles

Hypocatalasia, Acatalasemia

Identified in Beagles

Cobalamin Malabsorption

Identified in Beagles

Musladin-Lueke Syndrome

Identified in Beagles

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Identified in Beagles

Intervertebral Disc Disease (Type I)

Identified in Beagles and Shih Tzus

Additional Genetic Conditions

Explore the genetics behind your dog’s appearance and size.
Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Dark or Light Fur
E (Extension) Locus
Can have dark fur
Brown or Black Pigment
B (Brown) Locus
Black or gray fur and skin
Color Dilution
D (Dilute) Locus
Dark (non-dilute) fur and skin
Coat Color Modifiers

Coat Color Modifiers

Hidden Patterning
K (Dominant Black) Locus
More likely to have a mostly solid black or brown fur coat
Body Pattern
A (Agouti) Locus
No impact on coat pattern
Facial Fur Pattern
E (Extension) Locus
Can have black masking (dark facial fur)
Saddle Tan
No impact on coat pattern
Merle
M (Merle) Locus
Unlikely to have merle pattern
Other Coat Traits

Other Coat Traits

Furnishings LINKAGE
Likely unfurnished (no mustache, beard, and/or eyebrows)
Coat Length
Likely short or mid-length coat
Shedding
Likely heavy/seasonal shedding
Coat Texture
Likely straight coat
Hairlessness (Xolo type) LINKAGE
Very unlikely to be hairless
Hairlessness (Terrier type)
Very unlikely to be hairless
Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 2 LINKAGE
Likely not albino
Other Body Features

Other Body Features

Muzzle Length
Likely medium or long muzzle
Tail Length
Likely normal-length tail
Hind Dew Claws
Unlikely to have hind dew claws
Back Muscling & Bulk (Large Breed)
Likely normal muscling
Eye Color LINKAGE
Less likely to have blue eyes
Body Size

Body Size

Body Size 1
Smaller
Body Size 2
Larger
Body Size 3
Larger
Body Size 4
Intermediate
Body Size 5
Larger
Performance

Performance

Altitude Adaptation
Normal altitude tolerance
Appetite LINKAGE
Normal food motivation

Through Ace’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

A18/19/20/21/27/36/94/109/361

Map

A1b

Ace’s Haplogroup

This female lineage was very likely one of the original lineages in the wolves that were first domesticated into dogs in Central Asia about 15,000 years ago. Since then, the lineage has been very successful and travelled the globe! Dogs from this group are found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and southern Europe. By the end of the Bronze Age, it became exceedingly common in Europe. These dogs later became many of the dogs that started some of today's most popular breeds, like German Shepherds, Pugs, Whippets, English Sheepdogs and Miniature Schnauzers. During the period of European colonization, the lineage became even more widespread as European dogs followed their owners to far-flung places like South America and Oceania. It's now found in many popular breeds as well as village dogs across the world!

A18/19/20/21/27/36/94/109/361

Ace’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1b haplogroup, we see this haplotype in village dogs in over 25 countries across the world. We have detected this haplotype in lots of breeds, and it occurs most commonly in German Shepherd Dogs, Maltese, English Springer Spaniels, and English Setters.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

A1b is the most common haplogroup found in German Shepherds.

Through Ace’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1b

Haplotype

Ha.6

Map

A1b

Ace’s Haplogroup

For most of dog history, this haplogroup was probably quite rare. However, a couple hundred years ago it seems to have found its way into a prized male guard dog in Europe who had many offspring, including the ancestors of many European guard breeds such as Doberman Pinchers, St. Bernards, and Great Danes. Despite being rare, many of the most imposing dogs on Earth have it; strangely, so do many Pomeranians! Perhaps this explains why some Poms are so tough, acting like they're ten times their actual size! This lineage is most commonly found in working dogs, in particular guard dogs. With origins in Europe, it spread widely across other regions as Europeans took their dogs across the world.

Ha.6

Ace’s Haplotype

Part of the A1b haplogroup, this haplotype occurs most frequently in Basset Hounds.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Great Danes and Pomeranians have this in common!