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Kayden

Mixed Breed

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“Kayden was found as a stray 6 month old. He wandered into the pet cemetery of the Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Kanab, UT. We were volunteering there in 2011 and met him, then had him flown to Cleveland, OH in October. He's a good boy. Very shy and timid, but loves his little humans, snuggles his soft toys, and loves a good walk.”

Current Location

Cleveland, Ohio, USA

From

Kanab, UT, USA

This dog has been viewed and been given 13 wags

Genetic Breed Result

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Staffordshire Terrier

Staffordshire Terriers, sometimes referred to as "pit bull" type, are intelligent and trainable dogs. They can have a lot of energy and are often great canine athletes!

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Australian Cattle Dog

A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.

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Golden Retriever

Developed as an ideal hunting retriever, the Golden Retriever's eagerness to please and friendliness has made them an extremely popular family pet.

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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness

0.6 % LOW

Predicted Adult Weight

71 lbs

Genetic Age
91 human years

Based on the date of birth provided

Dogs Like Kayden

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Discover dogs who share a similar breed mix to Kayden. A higher score means the two dogs have more of their breed mix in common. A score of 100% means they share the exact same breed mix!

Click or tap on a pic to learn more about each dog and see an in-depth comparison of their DNA, breeds, and more.

DNA Breed Origins

Breed colors:
Staffordshire Terrier
Australian Cattle Dog
Golden Retriever

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Kayden
Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Staffordshire Terrier mix Staffordshire Terrier / Australian Cattle Dog mix Staffordshire Terrier Staffordshire Terrier / Golden Retriever mix Staffordshire Terrier Australian Cattle Dog Staffordshire Terrier Staffordshire Terrier Staffordshire Terrier Golden Retriever Staffordshire Terrier Staffordshire Terrier Australian Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Kayden’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Health Summary

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Kayden inherited two variants that you should learn more about.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd

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Kayden inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

This result does not impact your dog’s health. It could have consequences for siblings or other family members, and you should let them know if you are in contact with them.

What is Progressive Retinal Atrophy, prcd?

PRA-prcd is a retinal disease that causes progressive, non-painful vision loss. The retina contains cells, called photoreceptors, that collect information about light and send signals to the brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, for night vision and movement, and cones, for day vision and color. This type of PRA leads to early loss of rod cells, leading to night blindness before day blindness.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd4/cord1

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Kayden inherited one copy of the variant we tested

What does this result mean?

Because this variant is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner (meaning dogs need two copies of the variant to develop the disease), Kayden is unlikely to develop this condition due to the variant.

What is Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd4/cord1?

PRA-CRD4/cord1 is a retinal disease that causes progressive, non-painful vision loss over a 1-2 year period. The retina contains cells, called photoreceptors, that collect information about light and send signals to the brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, for night vision and movement, and cones, for day vision and color. This type of PRA leads to early loss of cone cells, causing day blindness before night blindness.

Breed-Relevant Genetic Conditions

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Multiple Drug Sensitivity

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 1, GR-PRA1

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Golden Retriever Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2, GR-PRA2

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd1

Identified in Staffordshire Terriers

Progressive Retinal Atrophy, crd2

Identified in Staffordshire Terriers

Collie Eye Anomaly

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Hereditary Cataracts

Identified in Staffordshire Terriers

Primary Lens Luxation

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Cystinuria Type II-A

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Urate Kidney & Bladder Stones

Identified in Staffordshire Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis, Cerebellar Ataxia, NCL4A

Identified in Staffordshire Terriers

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 5, NCL 5

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 8, NCL 8

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 5, NCL 5

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Degenerative Myelopathy, DM

Identified in Golden Retrievers

L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria, L2HGA

Identified in Staffordshire Terriers

Muscular Dystrophy

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Myotonia Congenita

Identified in Australian Cattle Dogs

Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Ichthyosis, ICH1

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Identified in Golden Retrievers

Additional Genetic Conditions

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Clinical Tools

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Base Coat Color

Base Coat Color

Coat Color Modifiers

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Performance

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Through Kayden’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

A17

Map

A1a

Kayden’s Haplogroup

A1a is the most common maternal lineage among Western dogs. This lineage traveled from the site of dog domestication in Central Asia to Europe along with an early dog expansion perhaps 10,000 years ago. It hung around in European village dogs for many millennia. Then, about 300 years ago, some of the prized females in the line were chosen as the founding dogs for several dog breeds. That set in motion a huge expansion of this lineage. It's now the maternal lineage of the overwhelming majority of Mastiffs, Labrador Retrievers and Gordon Setters. About half of Boxers and less than half of Shar-Pei dogs descend from the A1a line. It is also common across the world among village dogs, a legacy of European colonialism.

A17

Kayden’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this common haplotype is found in village dogs across the globe. Among breed dogs, we find it most frequently in Labrador Retrievers, Boxers, and Mastiffs.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Shar Pei dogs think A1a is the coolest!

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Through Kayden’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.7

Map

A1a

Kayden’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.7

Kayden’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this haplotype is found in village dogs throughout the world (including Asia, which is uncommon for A1a’s). We also see it in 10 of our breeds, including most frequently in English Springer Spaniel, Maltese, Havanese, and Rottweiler.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.

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