What is Embark?

Molly

Mixed Breed

“Molly is a young rescue pup. She's confident, brave, independent, playful and friendly. She loves long walks (anywhere she can explore with her nose), enjoys meeting new dogs and people. Molly is very much a terrier - she has boundless energy, has a strong hunting instinct, is wilful and has a big personality for her small size. She requires a lot of training, exercise and stimulation, otherwise she can get bored. She loves a cuddle but only after an action packed day.”

Instagram tag
@eastendmolly

Place of birth
London, England, United Kingdom
Location
London, England, United Kingdom
From
Chilterns Dog Rescue Society, Aston Clinton, Chivery Nr Tring, UK

This dog has been viewed 178 times and been given 6 wags

Registration

Microchip: 9410 - 0001 - 9943 - 671

Genetic Breed Result

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Mixed Breed

81.2% Border Terrier
14.9% Russell-type Terrier
3.9% Lakeland Terrier
Border Terrier Border Terrier
The Border Terrier was originally bred to assist in foxhunts, driving foxes out of their hiding places and out into the open for the hounds to chase. He still has a powerful drive to hunt and dig, as well as the energy level that enabled him to keep up with hunters on horseback. These traits can make him an aggravating pet for some owners; for others, Border Terriers are wonderful companions who play hard and love harder.
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Russell-type Terrier Russell-type Terrier
These small, energetic terriers, developed in 19th century England for hunting small game, are now some of the best agility dogs around.
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Lakeland Terrier Lakeland Terrier
The Lakeland Terrier is an energetic little fellow and is one of the oldest terrier breeds. Their original pupose was to hunt foxes, which their size and intelligence allowed them to do so with ease. Today they are primarily found as wonderful companions.
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Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 0.3 % LOW Learn More
Predicted Adult Weight: 16 lbs Learn More
Genetic Age: 23 human years Learn More

Breed Mix Matches

Explore other Embark dogs who have breed mixes that are similar to Molly’s.
A Mix Match of 100 means they are the exact same breed mix!

DNA Breed Origins

What’s this?
Breed colors:
Border Terrier
Russell-type Terrier
Lakeland Terrier

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Family tree

Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Changes to this dog’s profile
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  • On 4/10/2018 changed handle from "molly159" to "eastendmolly"

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Family Tree From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Border Terrier mix Border Terrier mix Border Terrier Russell-type Terrier / Border Terrier mix Border Terrier Border Terrier mix Border Terrier Border Terrier Russell-type Terrier Border Terrier Border Terrier Border Terrier Border Terrier Border Terrier mix

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Molly’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Maternal Haplotype

Paternal Haplotype

Through Molly’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace her mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that her ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

B1

Haplotype

B1b

Map

B1

Molly’s Haplogroup

B1 is the second most common maternal lineage in breeds of European or American origin. It is the female line of the majority of Golden Retrievers, Basset Hounds, and Shih Tzus, and about half of Beagles, Pekingese and Toy Poodles. This lineage is also somewhat common among village dogs that carry distinct ancestry from these breeds. We know this is a result of B1 dogs being common amongst the European dogs that their conquering owners brought around the world, because nowhere on earth is it a very common lineage in village dogs. It even enables us to trace the path of (human) colonization: Because most Bichons are B1 and Bichons are popular in Spanish culture, B1 is now fairly common among village dogs in Latin America.

B1b

Molly’s Haplotype

Part of the large B1 haplogroup, we see this haplotype in village dogs across the world, including those from Central America, the Middle East, South Asia, and the French Polynesian Islands. Among the 31 breed dogs we see it in, we see it in Poodles, Otterhounds, and Labrador Retrievers. It is also our most commonly-sampled Golden Retriever haplotype!

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The B1 haplogroup can be found in village dogs like the Peruvian Village Dog, pictured above.

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Family tree

Paternal Haplotype

This 'Paternal Haplotype' tab is for deep ancestral lineage going back thousands of years.

For recent ancestry—"What breeds did my dog inherit from her mom and dad?"—please refer to the Breed, Family Tree, or Summary tab.

The Paternal Haplotype refers to a dog’s deep ancestral lineage stretching back thousands of years, before there were any distinct breeds of dog. We determine the Paternal Haplotype by looking at a dog’s Y-chromosome—but not all dogs have Y-chromosomes!

Why can’t we show Paternal Haplotype results for female dogs?

All dogs have two sex chromosomes. Female dogs have two X-chromosomes (XX) and male dogs have one X-chromosome and one Y-chromosome (XY). When having offspring, female (XX) dogs always pass an X-chromosome to their puppy. Male (XY) dogs can pass either an X or a Y-chromosome—if the puppy receives an X-chromosome from its father then it will be a female (XX) puppy and if it receives a Y-chromosome then it will be a male (XY) puppy. As you can see, Y-chromosomes are passed down from a male dog only to its male offspring.

Since Molly is a female (XX) dog, she has no Y-chromosome for us to analyze and determine a paternal haplotype.

Explore:

Family tree

Maternal Haplotype